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THE TOWN OF 
IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 

2006 ANNUAL REPORT 







^H 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Standing left to right - Patrick J. McNally, 

Edward B. Rauscher, Chair, and James W. Foley 

Sitting - Elizabeth A. Kilcoyne, Ingrid F. Miles 



Cover photo: County Street Bridge during the 

May 2006 flood 
By Jane H. Spellman 



ANNUAL TOWN REPORT 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

2006 




TOWN OF IPSWICH 



BOARD OF 
SELECTMEN" 



TOWN 
MANAGER 






IV&XRi £5<iJ) 



HtKEflBSt 
rawasases 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Roster of Town Officials and Committees 7 

April 3, 2006 Annual Town Meeting 13 

October 16, 2006 Special Town Meeting 25 

Board of Selectmen 3 5 

Town Manager 3 9 

Department of Public Safety 42 

Police Department 42 

Fire Department 44 

Animal Control 4 8 

Harbors 5 

Shellfish 51 

Emergency Management 51 

Department of Public Works 53 

Public Works Divisions 53 

Facilities Department 56 

Cemeteries/Parks Department 57 

Department of Code Enforcement 58 

Building Department 58 

Health Department 59 

Zoning Board of Appeals 6 

Department of Planning and Development 61 

Planning Board 63 

Conservation Commission 65 

Historical Commission 67 

Housing Partnership 68 

Department of Human Services 7 

Recreation Department 70 

Youth Services 72 

Council on Aging 74 

Veterans Services 76 

Department of Utilities 77 

Electric Department 77 

Water Division 78 

Wastewater Treatment 7 9 



TABLE OF CONTENTS (CONTINUED) 

Finance Directorate 81 

Accounting Office 81 

Treasurer/Collector 82 

Assessors Office 83 



Town Clerk 83 

Elections and Registrations 86 

MIS Department . 87 

Purchasing/Budget/Risk Management 88 

Ipswich Public Library 90 

School Department 92 

Hall-Haskell House " 105 

Ipswich Cultural Council 106 

Open Space Committee . 107 

Ipswich Bay Circuit Trail Committee 107 

Government Study Committee 108 

Recycling Committee 109 

Trust Fund Commission Ill 

Agricultural Commission 112 

Cable TV Advisory Committee 114 

Town of Ipswich Americans With Disabilities Act .115 

Financial Statements-Fiscal Year Ending June 30,2006 



2006-2007 ROSTER OF TOWN OFFICIALS AND COMMITTEES 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




Edward Rauscher 


2008 


James Foley 


2006 


Patrick McNally 


2008 


Elizabeth Kilcoyne 


2007 


Ingrid Miles 


2007 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




Joan Arsenault 


2007 


Edmund Traverso 


2008 


Norman Sheppard 


2008 


Hugh 0' Flynn 


2009 


Dianne Ross 


2009 


Jeffrey Loeb,Ch 


2007 


Barry Hopping 


2008 


Ray Morley, Whittier Rep 



CONSTABLE 

Peter Dziadose 2009 

TOWN MODERATOR 

A. James Grimes 2007 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

E2 Elected at Town Meeting 
Daniel Clasby,Ch 2008 
Robert White 2009 
Marion Swan 2007 

03 Appointed by Moderator 
Jamie Fay 2 008 

William Craft 2009 
Clark Ziegler 2007 

S Appointed by Selectmen 

Janice Clements-Skelton * 01 
Michael Schaa 2009 
Raymond Morley 2 007 

E HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Kenneth Blades 2008 

Tone Kenney 2 010 

Moriah Marsh 2011 

Sara O'Connor 2009 

Edgar Turner 2 006 



APPOINTED ADMINISTRATION 



S TOWN MANAGER M 

Robert Markel 
SI FINANCE DIR./TOWN ACCT . 

Rita Negri Ml 

SI UTILITIES DEPT. DIRECTOR 

Tim Henry Ml 

SI TREASURER/COLLECTOR 

Kevin Merz Ml 

Ml ELECTRIC DEPT. MANAGER 

Vacant position Ml 

Ml ASSESSOR 

Frank Ragonese Ml 

Ml CODE INFORCEMENT 

BUILDING INSPECTOR M 

James Sperber 

Eric Colville, Asst. M 
Ml DIRECTOR OF PLANNING 

TOWN PLANNER M 

Glenn Gibbs 



HARBORMASTER 

Charles Surpitski 

Charles Schwartz, Deputy 

HEALTH AGENT 

Colleen Fermon 

LIBRARIAN 

Victor Dyer 

RECREATION DIRECTOR 

Elizabeth Dorman 

TOWN CLERK 

Pamela Carakatsane 

PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR 

Robert Gravino 

FIRE CHIEF 

Arthur Howe 

CEMETERIES/PARKS DEPT. 

James Graff urn 

COUNCIL ON AGING DIRECT. 

Diane Mitchell 



Kate Day, Asst. 

Ml DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC M SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 

SAFETY, POLICE CHIEF Philip Kent 

Daniel Moriarty, Acting 7 SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
Ml PARKING CLERK Richard Korb 

Corinna Warner M DIRECTOR OF FACILITIES 
M ASST. PURCHASING AGENT/ Joe Lucido 

RISK MANAGEMENT COORD. 

Jane Spellman 



APPOINTED BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



M CEMETERIES AND PARKS 
COMMISSION 

Nicholas Markos 2008 
Theodore LeMieux 2007 
Harry Argeropoulos 2 00 9 

M CIVIL DEFENSE/EMERGENCY 
MANAGEMENT 
Arthur Howe 2 007 

S COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 
Dorcas Rice 2007 

Joseph Carlin 2007 
Robert Waldner 2 007 
Chris Curry 2007 
Paul Sanborn 2 007 
Patricia Roworth 2007 
M6 CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
David Pancoast, Agent 
Glenn Wood 2008 

Brian O'Neill 2008 
David Standley 2009 
Jennifer Hughes 2009 
Barbara Beaman 2 00 9 
Ann McMenemy 2 007 
Sissy ffolliott 2007 
Associates : 

Sharon Cushing 2 007 
Vacant (2) 2007 

S FAIR HOUSING 

Sara O'Connor 2 007 
Tone Kenney 2007 
Bob Markel 2007 

S COUNCIL ON AGING 

Elizabeth Nelson 2008 
COA (CONTINUED) 
Cheryl Ferris 2008 
Patricia Parady 2007 
Carol Emerson-Owen 2009 
Tone Kenney 2 007 
Carol Poirier 2009 
Dorothy Chulyk-Butcher2008 

S REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Elizabeth McCarthy 2008 
Robert Stone 2009 
Philip Grenier 2007 

S SHELLFISH ADVISORY BOARD 
Joseph McCarthy 2 007 



S IPSWICH CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Kathleen O'Reilly 2008 
Rebecca Gayton 2008 
Michelle Shibley-McGrath' 09 
Dorothy Laurence , Ch 2 07 
Robin Silverman 2008 
Priscilla Herrington 2007 
Marianne Cellucci 2009 
Cynthia August 2 00 9 
Pamela Turnbull 2010 
Sunny West 2 010 

Terri Unger 2008 
Sr. Patricia Rolinger2009 
Blaze Johnson 2009 

S LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Robert Weatherall 2008 
Lawrence Pszenny 2008 
M.L. Scudder 2 08 
George Gray 2 09 
Judith Rusin 2009 
Philip Kuhn 2007 

William Thoen 2 07 
Marion Frost 2007 
Nancy Thompson 2 09 
Helen Danforth 2009 

S TRUST FUND COMMISSION 
Walter Pojasek 2008 
Jean Emerson 2009 
Robert Weatherall 2007 

S GOVERNMENT STUDY COM. 

Jeremy Hathaway 2 007 
Gerry Anne Brown, Ch 2007 
David Standley 2007 
Laura Dietz 2007 

Laura Hamilton 2007 

M6 HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Walter Pojasek 2009 
Wilma Gooby 2 008 

John Moss 2 008 

Peter Lampropoulos, ch *09 
June Gahan 2 00 9 

Marjorie Robie 2007 
Nancy Thompson 2 007 
HALL -HASKELL HOUSE COMMITTEE 
Theresa Stephens 2007 



M 



M 



John Pelletier 2007 

Evan Parker 2 007 

Paul Damon 2 007 

Joseph Kmiec 2 007 

Anthony Murawski 2 007 

Frank Michon 2007 
BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Frank Ragonese 2008 

John Moberger 2 009 

Karen Rassias 2007 

WATERWAYS ADVISORY COM. 

Ken Spellman,Ch 2 009 

Jeffrey French 2007 

Ronald Cameron 2 00 8 

John Wigglesworth 2 007 

Elton McCausland 2007 

Evan Parker 2 008 

Bill Callahan 2009 
PLANNING BOARD 

James Manzi 2 00 7 

Robert Weatherall 2005 

Michael Ryan 2006 

Emily Levin 2008 

Timothy Purinton 2009 
Cathy Chadwick, Assoc. 2007 
ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Dana Jordan 2 011 

Roger LeBlanc 2007 

Benjamin Fierro 2009 

Kevin Lombard 2 010 

Robert Gambale,Ch 2008 

Tim Perkins (Alt . ) 2007 
Robert Bodwell (Alt .) 2007 



Peg Burr 2 07 

William Thoen 2007 

Stephanie Gaskins 2007 

Margaret Broekel 2 007 

Ed Sukach 2 07 

James Lahar 2 07 

William Nelson 2007 

M BOARD OF HEALTH 

Spencer Amesbury,MD 2 009 

Susan Hubbard 2 07 
Vacant 

M RECREATION 

Edith Cook 2008 

Anne Josephson 2 009 

Kerrie Bates 2009 

Robert Donahue 2 09 

Kathryn Sheppard 2 07 

Dan McCormick 2007 

Christina Mercier 2008 

S COASTAL POLLUTION CONTROL 

Robert Marcaurelle 2007 

S SANDY POINT ADVISORY 

Joseph Parks 2 07 

Stanley Wood 2 07 

M IPSWICH BAY CIRCUIT TRAILS 

Lawrence Eliot 2007 

Mary Cunningham 2 07 

James Clark 2007 

Norman Marsh 2 07 

Barbara Ostberg 2007 

Ralph Williams 2007 

Linda Coan 2007 



OPEN SPACE COMMITTEE 

Ralph Williams 2007 
Douglas DeAngelis 2007 
Carl Nylen 2007 

OPEN SPACE (CONTINUED) 
Glenn Hazelton,Ch 2007 
Ruth Sherwood 2007 
David Standley 2007 
Carolyn Britt 2007 
CABLE TELEVISION ADVIS . 
Robert Markel 2007 
Scott Ames 2007 

Joseph Parks 2007 



S ACTION, INC. 



Tone Kenney 


2007 


Charlotte Dodge 


2007 


FEOFFEES COMMITTEE 




Robert Bonsignore 


2006 


Paul Surpitski 


2006 


Robert Weatherall 


2006 


Harvey Schwartz 


2006 


Robert White 


2006 


Ingrid Miles 


2007 


Susan MacDonald 


2007 


Joan Arsenault 


2007 



10 



M 



Greg Parachojuk 2007 

Thomas Lohnes 2 007 

Edmund Traverso 2 007 

Robert Ryan, Ch 2 007 

Robert White 2007 

Ingrid Miles 2007 
MOSQUITO CONTROL ADVIS. 



Lisa Galanis 

Ian Forman 

Ed Rut a 

Ernest Brockelbank 

Ann Wallace 

Robert Gambale 

HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

Michael Schaaf 

James Warner 

Michael Jones 

Donald Greenough 

Edward Dick 

Jay Gallagher 

Donald Bowen 

Vacant 

ATHLETIC PLAYING FIELDS 

STUDY COMMITTEE 

James Foley 

Beth 0' Connor 

Carl Nylen 

James Graff urn 

Ken Swenson 

Susan Markos 

Tom Gallagher 

Elizabeth Dorman 

Vacant 



2007 
2007 
2007 
2007 
2007 
2007 

2007 
2007 
2007 
2007 
2007 
2007 
2007 



2007 
2007 
2007 
2007 
2007 
2007 
2007 
2007 



IPSWICH RIVER WATERSHED 
DISTRICT ADVISORY BOARD 

David Standley 2007 

PUBLIC SAFETY FACILITIES 
COMMITTEE 

James Foley 2007 

Edward Dick 2007 

Charles Surpitski 2007 

Elizabeth Kilcoyne 2007 

William Thoen 2007 

Paul McGinley 2007 

Roland Gallant 2007 



S AFFORDABLE HOUSING TRUST FUND 

James Warner 2 09 

Elton McCausland 2007 

Michael Jones 2008 

Susan Monahan 2 08 
S AGRICULTURAL COMMISSION 

Laura Russell, Ch 2007 

Donald Galicki 2007 

Mike Victor 2007 

Mike Marini 2007 

Royce Knowlton 2007 

Mark Kozazcki 2007 

Caitlin Kenney 2007 

Fred Winthrop, Alt 2007 

Mario Marini, Alt 2007 

DESIGN REVIEW BOARD 

09 Thomas Troller 2007 

09 Maiya Dos 2008 

S Dianna Pacella 2008 

S Chris Saulnier 2009 

08 June Gahan 2 09 

S Mary Kroesser 2007 

S Ken Savoie 2008 

S RECYCLING COMMITTEE 

Mark Avenmarg 2 07 

Adam Pepper 2 07 

Renato DeLorenzo 2007 

Virginia Pepper 2007 

Bill Graham 2007 

Penny Devoe 2 07 

Joanne Delaney 2 07 

Nancy DelOrfano 2007 

Dan Jarmolowicz 2007 

Elizabeth Kilcyne 2007 

Phillip Grenier 2007 

S SHADE TREE & BEAUTIFICATION 
COMMITTEE 

Edward Rauscher 2 07 

James Foley 2 007 

Robert Gravino 2007 

Benjamin Staples 2007 

Armand Michaud 2 07 

Daniel Morrow 2007 

Denise King 2007 

Janet Craft 2007 



11 



John Morris 


2007 




Sean Cronin 


2007 




Willard Maker 


2007 




Jamie Fay 


2007 




COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 




PLAN IMPLEMENTATION 


E 


TASK FORCE 




S 


Web Bingham 


2007 




William Gallagher 


2007 


M 


Richard Kallman 


2007 




Thomas Mayo 


2007 





Ingrid Miles 


2007 


1 


Glenn Gibbs 


2007 




Kate Day 


2007 


2 


Vacancies (4) 




3 
4 
5 
6 



Marie Rodgers 2007 

Roxann Giddings 2007 

Judith Rusin 2007 

Jennifer Tougas 2007 

= Elected 

= Appointed by Board of 

Selectmen 
= Appointed by Town 

Manager 
= Other 
= Supervised by Town 

Manager 
= Elected at Town Meeting 
= Appointed by Moderator 
= General Laws 
= 1976 STM, Article II 
= Confirmed by Board of 

Selectmen 
7 - Appointed by School 

Committee 



12 



RECORD OF ACTION 

TOWN OF IPSWICH ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

APRIL 3, 2006 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the legal voters of the 
Town of Ipswich met in the Performing Arts Center at the 
Ipswich High School in said Town of Ipswich on Monday, 
April 3, 2006. A quorum being present (531 present-200 
required) the meeting was called to order by the Moderator, 
Arthur James Grimes, III, at 7:45p.m. 

Non registered persons were given permission to attend the 
meeting as spectators and seated on the floor to the left 
of the stage. 

ARTICLE 1 On motion of Mr. Patrick McNally, duly seconded, 
it was 

UNANIMOUSLY VOTED to: 

(1) to fix the salary and compensation of all elected Town 
Officers as presented in the town and school operating 
budgets ,- 

(2) to choose the following officers, viz: A Moderator for 
one [1] year; one [1] Selectmen for three [3] years; two 

[2] members of the School Committee for three [3] years; 
and one [1] member of the Housing Authority for five [5] 
years; the above officers to be voted on one ballot at 
the YMCA Gymnasium, 110 County Road, on TUESDAY, APRIL 
11, 2006; the polls shall open at 7:00 a.m. and shall 
close at 8:00 p.m.; 

(3) to transfer $260,754 from surplus funds in the 
Electric Division; and 

(4) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to appoint 
temporarily a member of said Board to Acting Town 
Manager for a limited period of time not to exceed the 
date of the 2007 Annual Town Meeting for purposes of 
vacation, leave, or absence in accordance with 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 268A, sections 20 and 
21A. 

ARTICLE 2 On motion of Mr. Daniel Clasby, duly seconded, 
it was 



13 



UNANIMOUSLY VOTED that the Town elect Robert White to the 
Finance Committee for a term of three (3) years. 



ARTICLE 3 On motion of Mr. James Foley, duly seconded, it 
was UNANIMOUSLY VOTED to amend its action taken under 
Article 7 of the April 4, 2005, Annual Town Meeting (the 
FY' 06 Municipal Operating Budget), as amended by Article 1 
of the October 17, 2005, Special Town Meeting to transfer: 



Department & 
Ca t egory 


From 


To 


Town Manager 
Expense 


(3,554) 




Board of Selectmen 
Expense 


(4,400) 




Treasurer Salary 


(2,132) 




Treasurer Salary 


(1,272) 




Treasurer Expense 


(300) 




Sanitation Expense 


(43,230) 




Legal Expense 




54,688 


Town Manager Salary 




200 








Highway Salaries 


(32,200) 




Forestry Salaries 


(12,800) 




Sanitation Expense 


(30,000) 




Highway Expense 




75,000 








Police Salaries 


(11, 000) 




Animal Control 
Salaries 




11,000 








Police Salaries 


(500) 




Animal Control 
Expense 




500 








Misc Finance Salary 


(2,400) 




Town Manager 
Expense 




2,400 








Management Transfer 


(12,225) 




Fire Department 




12, 225 



14 



So that total FY' 06 municipal operating budget, as so 
amended and inclusive of override debt service, shall total 
$12,324,364, offset by revenues totaling $537,016 leaving 
an amount to be raised and assessed of $11,787,348. 

ARTICLE 4 On motion of Ms. Ingrid Miles, duly seconded, 
it was 

UNANIMOUSLY VOTED to appropriate the sum of $29,966.12 to 

pay bills incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid: 

Department Category & Vendor Amount 

Consolidated Maintenance Edwards Systems 

Technology $ 1,350.00 

Police Dept Riverside Foreign Auto $ 29.00 

Health Dept Riverside Foreign Auto $ 29.00 

Animal Control Riverside Foreign Auto $ 29.00 

Health Insurance Rebate to Retirees $ 28 , 529 . 12 
Total $ 29,966.12 



And to meet this appropriation by raising $29,966.12 in 
taxes. 



ARTICLES On Motion of Mr. Daniel Clasby, duly seconded, it 
was 

VOTED BY A MAJORITY: 

(1) To raise and appropriate the sum of $11,798,051 for 
the purposes indicated in the FY' 07 Municipal Operating 
Budget as outlined in the Finance Committee Report, and 
that, in addition to the $11,798,051, the Town vote to 
raise and appropriate: 

for Excluded Debt Service $1,006,935 

for a Total Appropriation of $12,804,986; 

and 

(2) To transfer from available funds: 

from Free Cash $265,340 

from Free Cash (restricted revenue - Library) . . . $17,586 



15 



from Plum Is. National Wildlife Refuge In Lieu of Taxes. 
$36,266 

from 4% Tourism $ 689 

from Open Space Recreation Fund (stewardship position) . 
$17,880 

from Library Construction Grant $60,300 

from the overlay surplus $94, 500 

Total Available Funds $492,561 

Leaving a net to be raised and assessed of. . $12,312,425 

ARTICLE 6 On motion of Mr. Jeff Loeb, duly seconded, it 
was 

UNANIMOUSLY VOTED to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$17,484,172 for the School Department budget for FY' 07, and 
for the FY' 07 School Department budget of $17,484,172, 
transfer from available funds: 

Free Cash $265,339 

Plum Island National Wildlife Refuge In Lieu of Taxes. 

$ 36,265 

Overlay Surplus $ 94,500 

Total Available Funds $396,104 

Leaving a net to be raised and assessed of . . . .$17,088,068 



ARTICLE 7 On motion of Ms. Dianne Ross, duly seconded, it 
was 

UNANIMOUSLY VOTED to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$2,565,372 for FY' 07 debt service payments related to the 
construction and furnishing of the new Middle School and 
High School including, without limitation, moving expenses 
and expenses necessary to secure the former Whipple Middle 
School . 

ARTICLE 8 On motion of Dr. Hugh O'Flynn, duly seconded, it 
was 

UNANIMOUSLY VOTED: 



16 



(1) to appropriate the sum of $590,000 to survey, design 
and construct extraordinary repairs to the Winthrop and 
Doyon Elementary Schools, including original equipment and 
landscaping, paving and other site improvements incidental 
or directly related to such remodeling, reconstruction or 
repair, and to obtain any materiel and/or services 
necessary and incidental thereto; 

(2) to authorize appropriate town officials to apply for, 
accept and expend any federal and/or state grants and 
private gifts therefor; and 

(3) to raise said appropriation by authorizing the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to 
issue bonds or serial notes under the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 7 (3A) 



ARTICLE 9 On motion of Mr. Daniel Clasby, duly seconded, it 
was 

UNANIMOUSLY VOTED to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$400,720 for the Town's share of the FY' 07 annual 
operating, capital and debt service expenses of the 
Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School 
District . 

ARTICLE 10 On motion of Ms. Ingrid Miles, duly seconded, it 
was UNANIMOUSLY VOTED: 

(1) to raise and appropriate the sum of $2,288,705 for the 
FY' 07 operating, debt service, and capital expenses of 
the Water Division, Department of Utilities, said sum to 
be offset in part by the water surplus of $103,205, the 
balance of said appropriation to be met by revenues of 
the Water Division during FY' 06; and 

(2) to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,275,272 for the 
FY' 07 operating, debt service, and capital expenses of 
the Wastewater Division, Department of Utilities, said 
sum to be offset in part by the Wastewater surplus of 
$66,669, the balance of said appropriation to be met by 
revenues of the Wastewater Division during FY' 07. 



ARTICLE 11 On motion of Ms. Elizabeth Kilcoyne, duly 
seconded, it was 



17 



UNANIMOUSLY VOTED to appropriate the sum of $392,000 under 
the provisions of Chapter 90 of the General Laws to obtain 
any materiel, equipment and/or services incidental thereto; 
and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
easements in conjunction therewith by purchase, gift, 
lease, eminent domain or otherwise; and in furtherance of 
the project (s), to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
apply for, accept, and expend any federal, state and/or 
private grants without further appropriation; and to meet 
this appropriation by transferring an equal sum from 
Chapter 90 available funds. 

ARTICLE 12 On motion of Ms. Ingrid Miles, duly seconded, 
it was 

UNANIMOUSLY VOTED: 

(1) to transfer the sum of $5,000 from the Waterways 

Improvement Fund to fund the repair and repainting the 
hull of the Harbor Master's boat; and 



2) to transfer the sum of $20,000 from the Waterways 
Improvement Fund to purchase a new rescue boat to 
replace the existing rescue craft in the Fire 
Department ; and 



(3) to transfer the sum of $2,300 from the Waterways 
Improvement Fund to replace the boat used by the 
Shellfish Constable. 



ARTICLE 13 On motion of Ms. Elizabeth Kilcoyne, duly 
seconded, it was 

UNANIMOUSLY VOTED to re-authorize for FY' 07 the following 
revolving funds established under Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 44, Section 53E %: 

(1) A Council on Aging Revolving Fund, to be funded 

through activity fees. The COA Fund may be used to pay 
for special activities, expendable supplies and/or part- 
time wages. No more than $10,000 may be expended by the 
Council on Aging from monies transferred into said fund 
during FY' 07; and 



18 



(2) An Historical Commission Revolving Fund, to pay for 
preservation of Town records and the purchase of 
expendable supplies. No more than $5,000 may be expended 
by the Historical Commission from monies transferred 
into said fund during FY' 07. The source of funds shall 
be the sale of publications, such as replicas of the 
Declaration of Independence and other historical 
documents; and 

(3) A Health Division Revolving Fund, the use of said fund 
to finance additional part-time help in the Health 
Division and to pay related expenditures. No more than 
$7,000 may be expended by the Health Division in FY' 07 
from such excess funds transferred into said fund during 
FY' 07. The source of funds shall be housing code 
inspection fees; and 

(4) A Shellfish Department Revolving Fund, to be funded 
through a surcharge of $50 on commercial shellfish 
licenses, the use of said fund to enhance the shellfish 
resources of the town under the guidance of the 
Shellfish Advisory Board and Town Manager. No more than 
$7,000 may be expended the Shellfish Department 
Revolving Fund during Fiscal 2007. 

ARTICLE 14 On motion of Mr. Patrick McNally, duly 
seconded, it was 

UNANIMOUSLY VOTED to re-authorize for FY' 07 the following 
revolving fund established under Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 44, Section 53E y 2 : 

A Code Enforcement Department Revolving Fund to be funded 
through building permit fees (net of plumbing and gas fees) 
collected in excess of $150,000, the purpose of said fund 
being to finance additional part-time help in the Code 
Enforcement Departments and other related expenditures, and 
to determine that no more than $40,000 may be expended by 
the Code Enforcement Department in FY' 07 from such excess 
funds transferred into the revolving fund; and further that 
the FY' 06 Building Department Revolving Fund authorized 
under Article 5 of the Annual Town Meeting held on April 4, 
2005 be discontinued and that the funds remaining in said 
account be transferred into the Code Enforcement Department 
Revolving Fund. 



19 



ARTICLE 15 On motion of Mr. James Foley, duly seconded, it 
was 

UNANIMOUSLY VOTED to accept the reports of, and continue 
the following committees as standing committees of the 
Town: 

the Hall-Haskell Committee; the Athletic Playing Fields 
Study Committee; the Cable TV Advisory Board; the Commuter 
Rail Committee; the Community Development Plan 
Implementation Task Force; the Coastal Pollution Control 
Committee; the Eight Towns and the Bay Committee; the 
Government Study Committee; the Ipswich Bay Circuit Trail 
Committee; the Mosquito Control Advisory Board; the Open 
Space & Recreation Committee; the Parking Committee; the Ad 
Hoc Committee examining the Feoffees of the Grammar School; 
the Ipswich Coalition for Youth; the Public Safety 
Facilities Study Committee; the Shade Tree and 
Beautif ication Committee; the Recreation Committee; the 
Sandy Point Advisory Committee; the Shellfish Advisory 
Board; the Wind Power Committee; the Waterways Advisory 
Board and the Recycling Committee, the School Building 
Needs Committee and any other committee approved by the 
Town Meeting. 

ARTICLE 16 On motion of Ms. Elizabeth Kilcoyne, duly 
seconded, it was 

UNANIMOUSLY VOTED to accept $85,000 from the sale of Unit 
12 at 19 New Mill Place, said funds representing the 
proceeds that exceed the cost of the loan payoff and 
related expenses resulting from the foreclosure of this 
unit of Town supported "affordable housing," and further to 
transfer the aforementioned $85,000 from the General Fund 
into the Town's Affordable Housing Trust Fund. 



ARTICLE 17 On motion of Ms. Ingrid Miles, amended by Mr. 
Glen Gibbs , and duly seconded, it was 

UNANIMOUSLY VOTED to confirm the acceptance and layout of 
the following streets as public ways: Meetinghouse Green; 
North Main Street from Central Street to Meetinghouse 
Green; and Market Street between Union Street and Central 
Street, as shown on a plan entitled "Market & North Main 
Streets and Meeting House Green, Road Layout Plan of Land 
in Ipswich, MA, dated February 17, 2006, prepared by 
Hancock Associates, Professional Land Surveyors. 



20 



ARTICLE 18 On motion of Ms. Elizabeth Kilcoyne, duly 
seconded it was 

VOTED BY A 2/3 MAJORITY (30 YES TO 8 NO) : 

(1) to borrow the sum of $136,000 to undertake design and 
permitting for a wind turbine generator to be operated 
by the Ipswich Electric Light Department; and 

(2) to meet such appropriation, the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, be authorized to 
borrow said sum under the U.S. Clean Renewable Energy 
Bonds program or to borrow said sum in accordance with 
G.L. c44 or any other enabling authority. 



ARTICLE 19 On motion of Mr. James Foley, duly seconded, it 
was 

Voted BY A MAJORITY to submit a Special Act to the 
Massachusetts Legislature to permit the Town to issue an 
additional all alcoholic license to sell alcoholic 
beverages to replace the seasonal alcoholic license to be 
held by the Hellenic Center, as set forth in Article 19 of 
the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting held on April 3, 
2006. 

ARTICLE 20 On motion of Ms. Janice Clements-Skelton, duly 
seconded, it was 

VOTED BY A MAJORITY (215 YES - 88 NO) to place on the 
ballot for the April 10, 2007, Town Elections, the 
following non-binding referendum: 

"Shall the Town of Ipswich, acting through its various Town 
Boards, Committees, officials and interested citizens, seek 
to persuade and encourage the YMCA of the North Shore, Inc. 
to identify an alternative solution for the development of 
the so-called Powder House Village site, located at 108 and 
112 County Road. 

Said alternative shall include the creation of a minimum of 
18 units of affordable housing, as defined in the Ipswich 
zoning By-law, and be guided by the following performance 
standards and objectives: 



21 



1. A significant reduction in the overall density of the 
development . 

2. A significant scaling-back of the massing of the 
structures . 

3 . A significant increase in both the highway setbacks 

and landscaped areas. 
4. Consider a combination of both ownership and rental 

units . 

Or take any other action with respect thereto. 

ARTICLE 21 On motion of Mr. Patrick McNally, duly 
seconded, it was 

UNANIMOUSLY VOTED appropriate $1,685,000 for the purpose of 
purchasing for conservation and passive recreation purposes 
the fee simple interest in 17 tracts of land totaling 86.04 
acres, more or less, described in Article 21 of the Warrant 
for the Annual Town Meeting held on April 3, 2006 ("Article 
21"), including costs incidental and related thereto; that 
said land be managed and controlled by the Conservation 
Commission of the Town of Ipswich as further described in 
Article 21, and that the Town accept a total of $1,411,000 
in federal, state and private grants towards the 
acquisition of said parcels of land and that the 
Conservation Commission be authorized to file on behalf of 
the Town of Ipswich any and all additional applications 
deemed necessary for federal and state grants and/or 
reimbursements and to take all actions, enter and execute 
any and all instruments, including a Self -Help Project 
Agreement with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, which may 
contain restrictions and covenants, as may be necessary on 
behalf of the Town to effect said acquisition; and further, 
authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Conservation 
Commission to grant two perpetual conservation restrictions 
to the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and 
Recreation in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 184, Sections 
31-33 encumbering the land described in Article 21; and 
approve the expenditure of Open Space bond funds authorized 
under Article 18 of the April 3, 2000, Annual Town Meeting 
for the purposes set forth herein. 



22 



ARTICLE 22 On motion of Mr. James Foley, duly seconded, it 
was 

UNANIMOUSLY VOTED to submit a Special Act to the 
Massachusetts Legislature, as set forth in Article 22 of 
the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting held on April 3, 
2006, to authorize the Town, acting through the Board of 
Selectmen, to appeal a determination by the Massachusetts 
Department of Revenue as to the amount of state owned land 
within the Town. 

ARTICLE 23 On motion of Ms. Elizabeth Kilcoyne, duly 
seconded, it was 

UNANIMOUSLY VOTED to authorize the Town Manager to conclude 
a mutual aid agreement, as recommended by the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health, with other communities in the 
region to increase the capacity of Ipswich and local 
communities in Essex County to cope with threats to the 
public health. 

ARTICLE 24 On motion of Ms. Ingrid Miles, duly 
seconded, it was 

VOTED BY A 2/3 MAJORITY (18-3) : 

(1) to appropriate a sum of $180,000 to survey, design and 
construct a new roof for the Ipswich Public Library; 
and to obtain any materiel and/or services necessary and 
incidental thereto; 

(2) to authorize appropriate Town officials to apply for, 
accept and expend any federal and/or state grants and 
private gifts therefor; and 

(3) to raise said appropriation by authorizing the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, 
to issue bonds or serial notes under the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, Section 7 (3A) 

ARTICLE 25 On motion of Mr. James Foley, duly seconded, 
it was 

UNANIMOUSLY VOTED TO INDEFINITELY POSTPONE 



ARTICLE 26 On motion of Mr. Clark Ziegler, duly 
seconded, it was 



23 



UNANIMOUSLY VOTED to appropriate the sum of $100,000 to the 

Town's Stabilization Fund. 

ARTICLE 27 On motion of Mr. James Foley, duly seconded, 
it was 

UNANIMOUSLY VOTED TO INDEFINITELY POSTPONE 

On motion, duly seconded, it was VOTED to adjourn. 
The meeting adjourned at 12:20 a.m., April 4, 2006. 



24 



RECORD OF ACTION 
TOWN OF IPSWICH 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
OCTOBER 16, 2006 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the legal voters of the 
Town of Ipswich met in the Performing Arts Center at the 
Ipswich High School in said Town of Ipswich on Monday, 
October 16, 2006. a quorum being present (235 present - 
200 required) the meeting was called to order by the 
Moderator, Arthur James Grimes III, at 8:05 p.m. 

Non registered persons were given permission to attend the 
meeting as spectators and seated on the floor to the left 
of the stage. 

ARTICLE 1 On motion of Ms. Ingrid Miles, duly seconded, it 
was 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY (9/10 vote required) to: 

(a) appropriate the sum of $757.55 to pay unpaid bills 
incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid: 



Overhead Door Co. Consolidated Maint. 305.00 

Ipswich Utilities Consolidated Maint. 10.84 

Avaya Police 267.71 

Dept. Veteran Affairs Veteran Services 174.00 

TOTAL: $7 57.55 

and (b) to meet this appropriation by raising $757.55 from 
Fiscal 2007 taxes. 



ARTICLE 2 On motion of Mr. Patrick McNally, duly seconded, 
it was 

PASSED BY VOICE VOTE to: 



25 



Amend its action taken under Article 5 of the April 3, 
2006, Annual Town Meeting (the FY' 07 Municipal Operating 
Budget), as follows: 

a) transfer $45,000 from free cash to be added to the 
Miscellaneous Finance, Management Transfer Account (193- 
5110) to fund the 1% salary and wage increase for 
bargaining and exempt employees scheduled for January 1, 
2 07; and 

b) transfer $4,500 from free cash to the Library 
Department, Salaries Account (610-5116) to replace a 
Library employee for a period of four months on 
unanticipated medical leave; and 

c) transfer $5,542 from free cash to the Legal Department, 
Expenses Account (124-5312) to reimburse the Town for legal 
fees expended for the NUFIC litigation; and 

d) transfer $188,517 from the General Fund -- FEMA 
reimbursements to the Public Works Department, Highway 
Division, Road Treatment Account (424-5242) for expenses 
incurred during the May 2006 flood emergency; 

so that the total Fiscal 2007 municipal operating budget of 
$12,804,986, as so amended and inclusive of override debt 
service shall total $13,058,545 

DEFEATED BY A VOTE (56 IN FAVOR- 89 OPPOSED) MOTION MADE BY 
CLARK ZIEGLER TO AMEND ARTICLE 2 AS FOLLOWS: 

Amend its action taken under Article 5 of the April 3, 
2006, Annual Town Meeting (the FY' 07 Municipal Operating 
Budget), as follows: 

a) transfer $45,000 from the General Fund -FEMA 
reimbursement to be added to the Miscellaneous Finance, 
Management Transfer Account (193-5110) to fund the 1% 
salary and wage increase for bargaining and exempt 
employees scheduled for January 1, 2 07; and 

delete section b; and 

c) transfer $5,542 from free cash to the Legal Department, 
Expenses Account (124-5312) to reimburse the Town for legal 
fees expended for the NUFIC litigation; and 



26 



d) transfer $143,517 from the General Fund - FEMA 
reimbursements to the Public Works Department, Highway 
Division, Road Treatment Account (424-5242) for expenses 
incurred during the May 2 06 flood emergency; 



so that the total Fiscal 2007 municipal operating budget of 
$12,755,486, as so amended and inclusive of override debt 
service shall total $12,999,045 

ARTICLE 3 On motion of Mr. Edmund Traverso, duly seconded, 
it was 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to: 

Amend its action taken under Article 6 of the April 3, 
2006, Annual Town Meeting (the FY' 07 School Operating 
Budget) : 

a) by transferring a sum of $133,386 from free cash 
(Medicaid reimbursement) ; and 

b) by transferring a sum of $81,313 be added from free cash 
(NUFIC lawsuit settlement) ; and 

c) by appropriating a sum of $48,659 in available Chapter 
7 funds be added to the School Department budget; 

so that the total appropriation under this article will 
increase from $17,484,172 to $17,747,530. 



ARTICLE 4 On motion of Mr. James Foley, duly seconded, it 
was 

PASSED BY VOICE VOTE to: 

Amend its action taken under Article 9 of the April 3, 
2006, Annual Town Meeting (the FY' 07 Whittier budget) by 
increasing the appropriation from $400,720 to $509,935 to' 
meet the FY' 07 assessment, said sum to be transferred from 
free cash. 



27 



ARTICLE 5 On motion of Ms. Elizabeth Kilcoyne, duly 
seconded, it was 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to: 

to amend its action taken under Article 10 of the April 3, 
2006, Annual Town Meeting (the FY' 07 Sewer Division 
Operating Budget) by increasing the appropriation to be 
raised and assessed from $1,275,272 to $1,355,669, said sum 
to be offset by revenues from the Sewer Division during 
FY' 07. 

ARTICLE 6 On motion of Ms. Ingrid Miles, duly seconded, it 
was 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY (2/3 vote required) to: 

Amend its action taken under Article 11 of the April 3, 
2006, Annual Town Meeting (Chapter 90 appropriation), by 
increasing the Chapter 90 appropriation by $120,120 so that 
the total Chapter 90 appropriation for FY' 07 totals 
$512,120, the additional amount to be offset by increased 
Chapter 90 funds from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

ARTICLE 7 On motion of Ms. Ingrid Miles, duly seconded, it 
was 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to: 

Indefinitely postpone this article. 



28 



ARTICLE 8 Reports of the following committees were 

PASSED BY VOICE VOTE 

Community Development Plan Implementation Task Force 
Committee on Energy Use 
Recycling Committee 
Cable Advisory Committee 
Athletic Field Study Committee 

ARTICLE 9 On motion of Mr. Patrick McNally, duly seconded, 
it was 

PASSED BY VOICE VOTE to: 

Accept Section 37M of M.G.L. Chapter 71 (Consolidation of 
Administrative Functions with the Town) . 

ARTICLE 10 On motion of Mr. James Foley, duly seconded, it 
was 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to: 

Amend Article 18 of the Warrant for the April 3, 2000 
Annual Town Meeting by adding the following parcels to the 
Open Space Parcels List: 

a) Land now/formerly of Frederick A. Wegzyn, 71 Town Farm 
Road, also known as Assessor's Map 21, Parcel 82, 
consisting of approximately 7.0 acres at the corner of Town 
Farm and Greens Point Roads; 

b) Land now/formerly of Pony Express Farms, Inc., 24 
Candlewood Road, also known as Assessor's Map 63, Parcel 4, 
consisting of approximately 94.17 acres ; 

c) Land now/formerly of M+L Realty Trust, Assessor's Map 
53B, Lot 44, consisting of approximately 44 acres between 
Ipswich Woods Drive and the Ipswich River, just south of 
Colonial Drive . 

ARTICLE 11 On motion of Mr. Patrick McNally, duly seconded, 
it was 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to: 



29 



Appropriate, and authorize the Treasurer as listed on the 
Open Space Parcels list as amended with the approval of the 
Selectmen, under Article 18 of the April 3, 2000, Annual 
Town Meeting, to borrow $110,000 for the purpose of 
purchasing for conservation and passive recreation 
purposes, by negotiated purchase or otherwise, the fee 
simple interest in a tract of land totaling 44 acres, more 
or less, shown as Lot 44 on Map 53B of the Ipswich 
Assessor's maps, and further identified as Parcel A (36+ 
acres) and Parcel C (8.2+ acres) on a survey plan titled 
"Plan Accompanying A.N.R.A.D.", prepared for Habitech, Inc. 
by Northpoint Survey Services, 180 Water Street, Haverhill, 
MA, 01830, dated January 26, 2004, including costs 
incidental and related thereto; that said land be conveyed 
to the Town of Ipswich acting by and through its 
Conservation Commission under the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 8C, and as 
it may hereafter be amended and other Massachusetts 
statutes relating to Conservation, to be managed and 
controlled by the Conservation Commission of the Town of 
Ipswich, and that the Conservation Commission be authorized 
to file on behalf of the Town of Ipswich any and all 
applications deemed necessary for grants and/or 
reimbursements from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts under 
the Self-Help Act pursuant to Chapter 132A, Section 11 
and/or any other state and/or federal programs in any way 
connected with the scope of this Article, and that the 
Board of Selectmen and the Conservation Commission be 
authorized to take all actions, enter and execute any and 
all instruments, including a Self-Help Project Agreement 
with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, which may contain 
restrictions and covenants, as may be necessary on behalf 
of the Town to effect said acquisition. 

ARTICLE 12 On motion of Ms. Elizabeth Kilcoyne, duly 
seconded, it was 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY (2/3 vote required) to: 

Amend its action taken under Article 20 of the April 7, 
2003, Annual Town Meeting (High Street Sewer Extension) by 
appropriating $159,000 in addition to $116,000 appropriated 
under said Article 20 bringing the total appropriation to 
$275,000 for construction of a sanitary sewer extension to 
serve the area of 199-225; and to raise this appropriation 
by authorizing the treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial notes under 



30 



the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, as 
amended . 

ARTICLE 13 On motion of Mr. Michael Ryan, duly seconded, it 
was 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY (2/3 vote required) to: 

Amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich by 
amending "IX. SPECIAL REGULATIONS, I. Inclusionary Housing 
Regulations" as follows: 

1. by revising "3. a." as follows: 

a) by deleting in the first sentence the words "70% for 
rental housing" and substituting in lieu thereof 
"60 percent for rental housing"; and 

b) by adding a new second sentence, said sentence to 
read as follows: "The sales price 

or monthly rent shall, in all instances, be such 
that the dwelling unit qualifies as local 

initiative unit under the Commonwealth's Local 
Initiative Program (LIP) and meets the 

requirements of a subsidized housing unit for 
the purposes of listing in the Town' s 

subsidized housing inventory under G.L.C. 4 OB 
Sec. 20-23."; and 

c) by deleting in the second sentence the words "60 
percent" and substituting in lieu 

thereof "50 percent"; and 

d) by deleting in the third sentence the words "33 
percent" and substituting in lieu thereof 

"30 percent"; and 

2. by revising "2.b." by deleting the words "minimum lot 
size of the new lot is 43,560 square feet" and 
substituting in lieu thereof the words "minimum lot sizes 
of the new lot and the remaining parcel are 43,560 square 
feet each, or for large lot exceptions, three acres." 



ARTICLE 14 On motion of Mr. Timothy Purinton, duly 
seconded, it was 



31 



VOTED UNANIMOUSLY (2/3 vote required) to: 

Amend the Protective Zoning Bylaw of the Town of Ipswich as 
presented in Article 14 of the Warrant for the October 16, 
2006, Special Town Meeting, with the following change: 

Under (1) a) , revise the sixth bullet by adding, to the end 
of the bullet, the words "from the phrase beginning with 
'provided that'"; 

Under (1) b) , 2 na bullet, delete the words "enhance the 
historical integrity of the building" and substitute in 
lieu thereof the words ", in the opinion of the Planning 
Board, enhance the historical or architectural character of 
the building" 

ARTICLE 15 On motion of Ms. Elizabeth Kilcoyne, duly 
seconded, it was 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to: 

Authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept the deed from 
the Ipswich Historical Society of a gift of the fee simple 
interest in land located on County Street near its 
intersection with Elm Street, said property being 4,050 
square feet in area and shown as Lot 4 on Land Court Plan 
3401, on file with the town clerk's office; and further 
that the Board be authorized to accept the gift pursuant to 
certain terms and conditions, one of which shall be a 
restriction prohibiting any building from being erected on 
the property and others of which may include, but not 
necessarily be limited to, requirements to make certain 
improvements to the property subject to approval of the 
Historical Society, and a release and hold harmless of the 
Historical Society from liability or any hazardous 
materials that may be contained within the property. 



ARTICLE 16 On motion of Mr. James Foley, duly seconded, it 
was 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to: 

to accept the provisions of Section 23D of MGL Ch. 39 
(allowing members of any municipal board, committee or 
commission not to be disqualified from voting in an 



32 



adjudicatory hearing solely due to the absence from no more 
than a single session of the hearing at which testimony or 
other evidence is received) . 

ARTICLE 17 On motion of Ms. Elizabeth Kilcoyne, duly 
seconded, it was 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to: 

Indefinitely postpone this article. 

ARTICLE 18 On motion of Mr. Edward Rauscher, duly seconded, 
it was 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to: 

To modify Chapter XI of the Town's General Bylaws, Section 
2. Conveyances of Land by adding the following section 
2(d): 

(d)The Board of Selectmen is authorized to grant 
nonexclusive easements for walkway and sidewalk purposes, 
storm drainage, including above ground and below ground 
purposes, utility purposes, building or signage overhang 
purposes and for the purpose of rounding street corners, 
which the Board of Assessors have determined to have a 
fair market value of less than $25,000 or which are less 
than 5,000 square feet in size without a Town Meeting 
vote for such consideration as the Board of Selectmen 
deems appropriate, including nominal consideration. 



ARTICLE 19 On motion of Mr. James Foley, duly seconded, it 
was 

VOTED BY A MAJORITY (30 IN FAVOR- 19 OPPOSED) to: 

Authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the General 
Court for special legislation as set forth in Article 19 of 
the Warrant for the October 16, 2006, Special Town Meeting. 



33 



ARTICLE 20 On motion of Mr. Patrick McNally, duly seconded, 
it was 

VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to: 

Indefinitely postpone this article. 

The meeting was adjourned at 10:29 p.m. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Pamela Z. Car akat sane, CMC 
Town Clerk 



34 



******** 




BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Patrick J. McNally, Chair 

The year 2006 was an extremely busy and challenging year 
for the Board of Selectmen. However, 2006 will be 
remembered most for the so-called Mother's Day flood and 
its aftermath. The Ipswich River, and surrounding water 
bodies in Ipswich and throughout eastern Massachusetts, was 
inundated by days of rain in May. Our river rose and 
stayed high for weeks. While many homes and businesses 
were damaged by the flood, our bridges, especially the 
Choate, County Street, and Mill Road bridges, suffered 
great damage. The Choate and County Street bridges were 
closed for weeks, and the Mill Road Bridge is still closed, 
and will most likely not reopen until approximately late 
2008. The only major bridge that stayed open was the Green 

Street Bridge it carried all vehicular traffic south and 

east of Ipswich, and surrounding neighborhoods suffered 
great disruption. To make matters worse, the downtown was 
heavily flooded, and the historic building on the 
southeastern side of the Choate Bridge (housing the bridal 
shop and other businesses and apartments) burned and was 
demolished. Fortunately, no Ipswich residents died as a 
result of any of the emergencies. 



35 












; - 








J, 




; 


-J 




These emergency situations presented opportunities, as- 
well -as destruction. Town management and employees rose to 
the challenge and demonstrated a true ability to cooperate 
and work together. All town departments showed a 
willingness to solve the problems presented by the flood, 
and state and federal organizations, including the 
governor, lieutenant governor, state representative and 
senator assisted us. Our emergency management capabilities 
were tested, and proved to be more than adequate. The Town 
had to spend much money, and will need to spend more, but 
the federal and state governments assisted with 
reimbursements. After many years of effort, we were able 
to open the River Walk to help with pedestrian traffic. 
The new bridge and walk helped us recover from the flood 
and continues to bring great joy to walkers. In addition, 
we established the Bridge Advisory Committee to advise us 
on the repair and maintenance of our bridges. Overall, the 
entire town was drawn closer, worked together, and we now 
are a stronger community. 

Before, during, and after the emergencies, we continued 
with the everyday work of government and improved it. All 
members of the Board of Selectmen, including James Foley, 
Elizabeth Kilcoyne, Ingrid Miles, Edward Rauscher, and 



36 



Patrick McNally served on a variety of committees and sub- 
committees. The summer period, which is usually a time for 
fewer Selectmen meetings, was a time of great activity. 
The Board of Selectmen, with the assistance of the Town 
Manager, department heads, and employees, examined the 
structure of our government. The goal was to deliver 
services more effectively and efficiently. We decided to 
question the role of every department because it is good 
management and because the strained financial resources of 
the Town demands a new approach. We will implement our 
findings this year and next year. We are also continuing 

our efforts to consolidate functions with the schools for 

example, the Selectmen believe that building maintenance 
functions and financial functions can be combined to save 
money and to deliver services better. The Board of 
Selectmen does not accept the proposition that "business as 
usual" is the best way to conduct Town business. 

This was a successful year for the Town for other reasons 

too. The Recycling Committee made great strides 

recycling is at an all-time high. In fact, it will cost 
less next year for trash pickup than it did this year 
because more residents are recycling more. In addition, 
Ipswich has more protected open space now than last year. 
Of particular interest is the latest parcel of land that 

the Town acquired from the Proprietors of Great Neck 85 

acres of open space for conservation and recreation. Also, 
the transfer of the Old Town Hall to a company that plans 
to create an entertainment center, including a movie 
theatre, is now final. Ipswich, through the efforts of the 
Cable TV Advisory Committee, now has a choice of two cable 
TV providers (Comcast and Verizon) . The Municipal Parking 
Committee made strides in reorganizing our parking 
resources, and the Shade Tree and Beautif ication Committee 
reinvigorated the "traffic islands" and other green areas 
of Town. In addition, there are scores of other committees 
(too numerous to mention here) working diligently to 
improve Ipswich. 

The Board of Selectmen, as Commissioners of Electricity, 
Water, and Waste Water, also had a busy year. We worked 
hard to keep electricity rates as low as possible. In 

addition, we continued our efforts to develop wind power 

we did not gain the grant we needed, but we are looking at 
other sources. But, we have also realized the great 
importance of conservation. We established the Commission 
on Energy Use and Climate Protection to address the demand 



37 



side of power to assist in conserving our resources. Our 
efforts to reduce water consumption through the use of 

seasonal rates worked the Town now uses less water. We 

have made gains in the waste water area as well we 

continue to successfully compost our effluent, have clean 
discharge, and the capability to accept more users. 

This year was a time of change for the management personnel 
of the Town. For example, long-time Chief of Police and 
Director of Public Safety, Charles Surpitski, retired, and 
was replaced by Acting Chief of Police Daniel Moriarty. 
Deputy Chief, Peter Foote, and Detective Charles Cooper who 
was also Director of Emergency Management also retired. 
And, Acting Fire Chief, Willard Maker, returned to his 
Lieutenant position when Arthur Howe was hired as permanent 
Chief. Others have also left Town service, and we thank 
them all . 

Finally, three members of the Board of Selectmen ("the 
three eldest in that of f ice"— Kilcoyne , McNally and 
Rauscher) reassumed the role of "Feoffees of the Grammar 
School in the Town of Ipswich," and joined the four life- 
time Feoffees in that role. The seven Feoffees essentially 
serve as trustees in the management of Little Neck and the 
income produced for the benefit of the school system. From 
the information available, it appears that, until now, the 
three Selectmen members have not actively served as 
Feoffees for approximately 100 years. This land trust (the 
oldest in the United States at over 250 years) has been in 
turmoil for some time because the Feoffees and the 
residents of Little Neck have not entirely agreed on the 
dollar value of the leases for the property on Little Neck. 
Both parties are currently in court, and the Selectmen hope 
that they can serve productively as Feoffees. 

The above is a compilation of what I will remember as the 
significant highlights of 2006. I realize that I did not 
cover every success story, and I also know that we can 
always do better. My fondest memories of 2006 will be the 
sense of camaraderie and shared attention to problem 
solving that the Board of Selectmen applied to their work. 
I thank my colleagues on the Board of Selectmen, the Town 
Manager, all Town employees, and, of course, the citizens 
of Ipswich for their support and understanding. 



38 



******** 







TOWN MANAGER 

Robert T. Markel 

The major challenge for Town government and the Town 
Manager during 2006 was the disastrous and costly "Mother's 
Day Flood" in May. There are nearly 6,000 residences in 
Ipswich, and it is estimated that approximately 50% of 
these had some flood related damage. Businesses in the 
center of town suffered extensive flooding damage as flood 
waters overspread Market Street. Nearly 50 business 
establishments were forced to close. EBSCO Publishing, the 
Town's largest employer, had 5 feet of water in the 
archives section and incurred more than $10 million in 
damages . 

The Willowdale, Mill Road, Choate and Green Street Bridges 
incurred major structural damage and had to be closed. The 
Massachusetts Highway Department assumed responsibility and 
initiated a massive program to repair these structures, at 
a cost exceeding $4 million. The Mill Road Bridge will 
require complete reconstruction and is not expected to re- 
open until 2009. Coping with the flood and its aftermath 
consumed most of the Town's human and financial resources 
during May and June . 

With state financial support for cities and towns on the 
decline, the Selectmen and Town Manager announced in March 
that they would undertake a comprehensive review of all 
Town departments with the intent of streamlining services 
and saving tax dollars. This project began in June and 
continued until fall. The report, issued in October, 
recommended significant reductions in personnel and some 
restructuring of Town services. The recommendations will 
require several years to fully implement, but the 



39 



recommended changes in personnel are incorporated into the 
Fiscal 2008 municipal budget. 

During the past year, the Town has undertaken new 
initiatives along a broad range of environmental concerns. 
The Selectmen and Town Manager and citizen groups have 
created new committees and implemented new policies to 
address emerging environmental concerns. 

There was heightened awareness of the need to increase 
recycling of solid wastes. The cost for collection and 
incineration of trash exceeds $900,000 annually, and in 
2005, this expense was the second fastest growing item in 
the Town budget . 

Recycling trash is far less costly than hauling it to an 
incinerator and paying a "tipping fee," and so the 
Selectmen, Town Manager and Department of Public Works 
joined together with a citizen-based Recycling Committee to 
promote awareness and increase the percentage of recycled 
materials in the Town's solid waste stream. This 
initiative was a resounding success in 2006. The Town's 
recycling percentage went up resulting in an actual 
reduction in the solid waste budget in the current year. 

Other environmental initiatives in 2006 include the 
establishment of a Commission on Energy Use and Climate 
Control; the revival of the Shade Tree and Beautif ication 
Committee; the establishment of a Stormwater Management 
Committee and a Flood Control Committee. The Electric 
Light Department is continuing towards its goal of 
constructing a wind turbine generator (wind mill) at Town 
Farm Road. In 2006, the first "green roof" on the North 
Shore was completed at the former Whipple Annex which is 
being converted to a senior housing project. 

Activities and initiatives of the Town Manager during 2006 
include: 1) the establishment of a monthly meeting with the 
downtown business community known as the Economic 
Roundtable; 2) the updating of the Town's 20 year vehicle 
replacement plan and a commitment to purchase only hybrid 
or fuel efficient vehicles for the Town fleet; 3) an 
ongoing program to enable more of the transactions between 
the Town and its citizens, such as the purchase of beach 
stickers, over the Town of Ipswich website 
( ht t p : / /www . t own . I pswi ch . ma . us ) ; 4) the inclusion of 
Verizon as a competitor with Comcast in the Town's cable TV 



40 



market; and 5) the ongoing effort to improve the Town's 
financial planning, with a current focus on five year 
capital budgeting. 

In the coming year, the condition of the Central Fire 
Station will assume a higher profile. The station is 
nearly a century old, has significant structural problems 
and does not have the capacity for modern fire apparatus. 
The Public Safety Facilities Committee is again meeting 
regularly to evaluate alternatives and there is an 
expectation that the Committee will have a recommendation 
for Town Meeting in 2007. 

Lastly, some long term employees of the Town retired in 
2006. Public Safety Director and Police Chief Charles 
Surpitski retired in November after 32 years with the 
Ipswich Police Department. Deputy Police Chief Peter Foote 
also retired after 31 years of service. 

Charles Cooper, Police Officer and the Town's Emergency 
Management Director retired in October. Also, Bob Hetner, 
the Public Works Department's diesel mechanic, and Animal 
Control Officer, Harry Leno retired in 2006. Tone Kenney 
retired as Principal Clerk in the Public Works Department 
and was succeeded by Michelle Young. Bill Ford retired as 
Power Plant Superintendent and was succeeded by Robert 
Stone, and John Quigley retired as Wastewater 
Superintendent and was succeeded by Patrick Brennan. 

In July, Arthur Howe was appointed Ipswich Fire Chief. 
Carl Lemiesz was appointed as Electric Operations Manager 
in March, and Mark Cousins became Utilities Department 
Business Manager in January. Robert Stone was appointed 
Power Plant Superintendent and Patrick Brennan succeeded 
John Quigley as Wastewater Superintendent. Lastly, 
Assistant Animal Control Officer, Matt Antczak was 
appointed Animal Control Officer and Inspector of Animals 
during 2 06. 



41 



******** 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY - Daniel L. Moriarty, Director 




POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Acting Chief of Police: Daniel L. Moriarty 
Acting Deputy Chief: Gavin J. Keenan 

During the past year, the Police Department underwent major 
changes in the area of personnel. In February, Deputy Chief 
Peter Foote retired after 39 years of service. In October, 
Detective Charles Cooper retired after 32 years, and 
November marked the retirement of Chief Charles Surpitski 
after 3 5 years of service. The Town has been well served by 
these dedicated officers, and their experience and presence 
will be missed. To fill these voids, Sergeant Daniel 
Moriarty was appointed Acting Chief, Sergeant Gavin Keenan 
was appointed Acting Deputy Chief, Patrolman Justin Daly 
was appointed Sergeant, Patrolman Peter Nikas was appointed 
Acting Sergeant, and Patrolman Michael Thomas was appointed 
Detective. A smooth transition in these key positions 
ensured that the Department continued to function 
effectively. 

While working closely with other Town departments, 
neighboring communities, and state agencies, the Police 
Department was able to deal proficiently with a wide 
variety of problems. This was evident with the handling of 
the May floods, the damage and closure of two major 



42 



bridges, and the downtown fire during the spring and summer 
months . 

At the end of 2006, five new officers were added to the 
Department. Upon their graduation from the Police Academy 
in February 2007, the Department will once again be fully 
staffed. The Department will continue to serve and protect 
the citizens of Ipswich, making Ipswich a most desirable 
place to live. 

The Police Log during 2006 reflected 10,262 calls for 
police services, including 333 calls to our 911 system. It 
should be noted that these numbers do not reflect other 
citizen/police or citizen/communication center interaction. 
These numbers indicate significant activity on the part of 
the Police Department. 

Below are some of the incidents with which the police 
dealt : 



Accidents, motor vehicle - 315 


Fraud/ID theft - 19 




Alarm activations - 552 


Harassing phone calls - 40 




Animal related calls - 240 


Larceny - 86 




Arrests adult - 110 


Malicious/wanton property damage 


Arrests juvenile - 12 


- 60 




Assaults - 27 


Medical aid - 723 




Breaking & entering - 106 


Parking tickets - 554 




Disturbing the peace - 187 


Suspicious activity - 382 




Domestic disturbances - 113 








43 



******** 



IPSWICH FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Arthur Howe III 
Fire Chief 

The year 2 00 6 was a year of great change and challenge for 
the Ipswich Fire Department - highlighted by the 
appointment of Arthur Howe III as the new Fire Chief, the 
devastating floods of May, and the major downtown fire in 
June . 

Several of the major changes and challenges include the 
following: 

1) The devastating floods of early May that closed 
multiple bridges and caused enormous property damage. 
Ipswich was fortunate to have no loss of life, not 
the case in other towns. The Fire Department 
experienced a workload in excess of 200 calls for 
service within an approximately 72 hour period, 
followed by many weeks of follow-up and inspection 
service to restore the downtown and its critical 
status for commerce and transportation. 

2) The multiple alarm fire next to the Choate Bridge 
while the bridge was out of service, with a resulting 
loss of approximately $790,000. Fortunately, the fire 
was contained to two buildings, and there were no 
injuries . 

3) The appointment of Arthur Howe III as the Fire Chief. 
Chief Howe has 33 years in the fire service to 
include time with volunteer, combination, industrial, 
and career departments, as well as three years with 
the Connecticut Fire Academy. 

4) The receipt of three specialized pieces of equipment: 

a) A 19' RIBCRAFT marine rescue boat that performed a 
successful rescue within the first week; 



44 




b) A Ford four-wheel drive forestry truck, Squad 1, 
obtained through a federal grant; 




A John Deere Gator (all-terrain vehicle) and 
trailer obtained through an emergency management 
grant to be used for off -road rescue, search, and 
patient removal . Vehicle to be shared by both Fire 
and Police. 



45 




5) The completion of basic Incident Command in September 
by the vast majority of the department, one step 
towards compliance with the Federal Directive for 
NIMS (National Incident Management System) , and 
subsequent change in department response and radio 
protocol to reflect this. 

6) Two successful open houses at each fire station to 
encourage the community in partnering with their Fire 
Department. Children particularly appreciated the 
escape trailer. 

7) Worked with media, community groups, and individuals 
to foster a more open relationship with the Ipswich 
Fire Department . 

8) Rejuvenation of the Public Safety Facilities Study 
Committee to work towards resolution of the Fire 
Department's aging, inefficient, and increasingly 
unsafe Central Fire Station. 

The Department continues to strive in meeting the dynamic, 
rapidly changing fire service and emergency environment, 
with particular note to emergency management as we develop 
a more comprehensive all risk approach. While we will 
continue to improve, it will be challenging to meet the 
increasing number of professional standards, statutes, and 
mandates given existing resources. 



46 



A high standard of customer service will continue to be 
emphasized, both within the department and outside the 
department with the citizens, business community, and 
visitors. I would appreciate hearing from you if the Fire 
Department has performed excellent service. Likewise, I 
would ask for your thoughtful comments if we have failed to 
deliver excellent service. You can reach me at 
f irechief@town. ipswich.ma.us (preferred method) or 978-356- 
6627. Thank you for your continued support as we work 
together to raise the professional standard for your 
Ipswich Fire Department. 

Statistics: Calls for service: 2,057 
Broken down as follows: 

Structure fires: 12 

Other fires: 35 

Medical/rescue: 724 

False alarm: 332 

Mutual aid: 33 

Hazardous materials: 69 

Other hazardous responses: 107 

Miscellaneous responses: 745 

Calls by geographical district: 

In town (downtown) 759 
Neck Rd. 119 
High St. 255 
Topsfield Rd. 186 
County Rd. 44 7 
Linebrook Rd. 23 2 



47 



******** 




ANIMAL CONTROL 

Matt Antczak, Animal Control Officer 

Girard Martin, Assistant Animal Control Officer 

In 2006, the Ipswich Tag, Neuter, and Release Program was 
started to help control the growing population of feral 
cats in Ipswich. We also began a "Safe Cat" program to 
educate cat owners about why cats should be kept indoors. 
It was also the first year for bi-weekly articles in the 
Ipswich Chronicle about our wild and domestic animal 
populations, how we can live with them, and what we can do 
to help keep them away when they become a nuisance. 

The following are some of the calls responded to in 2006: 



Calls pertaining to dogs: 
Picked up: 114 (which 90 
Reported loose: 153 
Impounded: 10 
Adopted: 8 
Hit by cars: 7 
Barking complaints: 113 
Dog bites: 18 
Quarantines ordered: 24 
Fouling citations: 7 
Leash law citations: 31 
Barking dog citations: 9 



had their tags on) 



48 



Calls pertaining to cats: 
Picked up : 119 
Reported lost: 163 
Adopted: 92 
Hit by cars: 42 
Reported stray or wandering 
Quarantines ordered: 43 
Returned to owners: 7 



117 



Please note the ratio of lost cats to cats returned to 
owners!! Safe cats are indoor cats!! 

In addition, 1,911 dogs were licensed for 2006; 168 wild 
animals were hit by cars; 4 specimens were sent to the 
state lab for testing (all negative) ; 99 barn inspections 
were conducted; 16 seal related calls were received; and 
4,500 calls were made to the Animal Control Department and 
responses were made to 4,200 of those calls. 







Matt is receiving training for handling dangerous illegal 

reptiles and snakes found more and more frequently in 

Massachusetts. The all day training was held in Beverly at the 

Rain Forest Reptile Shows facility. 



49 



******** 



HARBORS DEPARTMENT 

Daniel L. Moriarty, Harbormaster 

Charles B. Schwartz, Assistant Harbormaster 

There were no major incidents on our waterways during the 
2006 boating season. Boater education and responsible 
boaters, combined with staggered patrols by our patrol boat 
and our personal watercraft, as well as the assistance of 
the Fire Department and Crane Beach personnel, were 
responsible for this accomplishment. 

The Harbors' sixteen year old patrol boat experienced 
significant difficulty this boating season. All of the 
boat's equipment is sixteen years old and needs 
replacement; and the water logged hull was determined to be 
irreparable by Boston Whaler. The department will be 
requesting a replacement vessel at the 2007 Annual Town 
Meeting with funds to be taken from the Waterways 
Improvement Fund . 

The pumpout boat, completing its seventh season, continues 
to help keep our waterways clean and pollution free. 
Working in conjunction with the Town of Rowley, there is 
seven-days-a-week coverage. This service is free to 
boaters. Our boat pumped 3,410 gallons of effluent this 
season. The drop in this figure from last year's amount 
pumped is indicative of the impact of higher gas prices and 
an inclement summer. 

The Harbors Department is grateful to the Waterways 
Advisory Committee for its untiring efforts, counsel and 
support in the never-ending myriad of issues that is the 
Harbors Department . 

A total of $30,041.18 was collected in 2006 boat excise 
taxes; of this amount $15,634.42 went to the Waterways 
Improvement Fund and $14,406.76 (50% of the total collected 
minus any abatements) went into the Town's general fund. 

Also contributed to the Town's general fund were the 
revenues collected by the Harbor Department issuance of: 

676 mooring permits ($45,252) 

507 in-state daily launch permits ($2,535) 

199 in-state seasonal launch permits ($6,965) 



50 



1 out-of-state daily launch permit ($15) 
1 out-of-state seasonal launch ($105) 

Thus, between the boat excise taxes and the permits issued, 
the Harbor Department contributed $69,278.76 to the Town's 
general fund. 

******** 

SHELLFISH DEPARTMENT 

Shellfish Constable: Phillip Kent 

Shellfishing improved in 2006 due to good seeding of clams 
over the last two years . 

During 2006, there were approximately 15,208 bushels of 
clams harvested from our area, despite the fact that all 
shellfish areas were closed due to Red Tide from May 17 to 
July 18 and were closed for an additional 81 days due to 
rain. 

The Shellfish Department continued its efforts to enforce 
and protect the resources during 2006. As in past years, 
personnel worked closely with the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Department of Marine Fisheries, other area 
Shellfish Constables, and Town departments in monitoring 
water quality essential to a healthy shellfish product and 
to ensure the safety and proper harvesting of this most 
precious resource. 

The Town Clerk issued 116 commercial shellfish licenses, 17 
free commercial licenses to residents over 70 years of age, 
84 residential recreational licenses, 128 family 
recreational licenses, and 138 non-resident recreational 
licenses . 

******** 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

This year, Emergency Management Director, Charles Cooper 
retired after a very busy year. The "Mother's Day Flood" 
in May saw the height of the Ipswich River rise to nearly 
11 feet, or 4 feet above flood stage. This was the highest 
level ever recorded, and the May 2006 flood was the most 
damaging in the Town's history. 



51 



On June 9, as the flood water were receding, there was a 
catastrophic fire at 17-25 South Main Street, a large mixed 
use building immediately adjacent to the Choate Bridge at 
the southwest corner. The fire broke out before 11:00 p.m. 
on Friday night. The four alarm blaze started at Immie 
Designs, 19 South Main Street, and engulfed the entire 
building. Firefighters from Ipswich were assisted by 
companies from Newburyport , Rowley, Newbury, Topsfield, 
Essex, Danvers and Beverly. 

These events tested the Town' s emergency response system. 
While there are always areas for improvement, the consensus 
among Town officials and citizens alike is that teamwork, 
cooperation and coordination among the Town's first 
responders was excellent. 

Ipswich currently has a robust and flexible communications 
system for use in the event of a disaster. This radio 
equipment allows us to communicate with local, state and 
federal agencies using a variety of modes and frequencies. 

Incident Command System Training has been implemented for 
all first responders. Mandated by the federal government, 
ICST training will ensure that all responders are 
functioning under the same protocols in the event of a 
disaster. By September 2006, all first responders had 
completed the initial training, and the Town is fully 
compliant with federal regulations. 

In the fall, the Town's emergency management team was 
convened by the Town Manager to review all facets of 
emergency response, including communications with the 
general public during a crisis. The team reviewed and 
approved the following: 1) replacement of the telephone 
based emergency notification system; 2) the designation of 
a member of the team to be the official Public Information 
Officer, responsible for all communications with the media 
and the public during a crisis; and 3) the location of an 
emergency operations center in Town Hall from which all 
emergency operations will be directed during a disaster. 

At the close of 2006, a search was underway to identify a 
new Emergency Management Director, an assistant EMD and an 
official Public Information Officer. 



52 



**■*■*•**** 



PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTORATE - Robert C. Gravino, Director 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

Robert C. Gravino, Director 

The Public Works Department is a customer focused service 
organization, dedicated to maintaining and improving the 
town' s infrastructure through the efforts of a professional 
work force. With that as our mission, DPW incorporates an 
on-going review of what we do and how we do it, with the 
intent of delivering high quality service to our customers 
and enhancing the quality of life in our diverse community. 
Customer focus, continuous process improvement, human 
resource development, and resource management are the keys 
to our success. 

Public Works accomplished or is working on the following 
items in support of our mission: 

• Provide technical input to Town boards and commissions 
on special permits, subdivisions, site plan reviews, 
and commercial and residential development that impact 
on Public Works' Operations and Maintenance (O&M) 
responsibilities and budget. 

• Implemented Year 3 of the Storm Water Management Plan 
to comply with the Phase II Storm Water Rule 
Regulations of the Federal Clean Water Act. 

• Incorporate an Infrastructure Asset Management Program 
into the Town's Geographic Information Systems (GIS) 
mapping and databases, specifically for roadway and 
drainage infrastructure management. 

• Developed and implemented Operation and Maintenance 
plans for existing water quality structures installed 
for storm water management . 

• Provided technical assistance to homeowners to correct 
illegal discharges of water from their property into a 
public way. 

• Use the DPW Pavement Management Plan to identify and 
schedule those roads most in need of roadway 
improvement and maintenance . 

The most significant event this year, for both Public Works 
and the Town, was the rainstorm and flood event that 
occurred on the weekend of Mother's Day in May. Public 
Works became a key participant in the team established 



53 



among town officials and departments to manage and respond 
to this event. Public infrastructure and private property 
damage in excess of $5,000,000 resulted from the unusual 
set of metrological systems all coming together to produce 
a heavy rain that lasted for days. Public Works' personnel 
were involved in the immediate barricading of washed out 
roads and the closing of the County Street, Mill Road, and 
Choate Bridges and traffic diversions and detours required 
when these major transportation structures were found to be 
at severe risk from the flooding of the Ipswich River. In 
the days following the rains, Public Works worked long 
hours repairing culverts, grading and repaving roadways, 
and returning the Town's transportation infrastructure to 
an operable condition. 




Crews assessing and working on the damage on Linebrook Road 
HIGHWAY DIVISION 

In the warmer months, the focus is on outdoor construction 
projects, where personnel skills and heavy equipment 
produce significant infrastructure repairs and improvements 
to roads, sidewalks, public facilities, and stormwater 
structures. A work order system assists in prioritizing 
and scheduling assignments when weather or personnel 
availability precludes accomplishment of major jobs. 

FORESTRY DIVISION 

The Forestry Division focused this year on the maintenance 
of town trees along public ways and in town cemeteries, 



54 



parks, and open space. The Forestry budget is partially- 
funded by the Utilities Department for line clearing done 
for the Electric Light Division. A significant percentage 
of the line clearing occurred on Linebrook and Argilla 
Roads . 

EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

Closer inspection and additional preventive maintenance of 
vehicles has extended the service life and reduced the 
maintenance costs of the Public Works fleet. 

TRANSFER STATION 

The Transfer Station accepts yard waste only, specifically 
grass clippings, leaves, brush, and small branches, and is 
open Wednesdays and Saturdays, 8:00 AM until 3:30 PM . 
White goods, electrical appliances, and TV's and computer 
monitors are disposed of curbside by the Town' s trash 
contractor through the purchase of a $25 sticker, available 
at the Public Works office in Town Hall. The Transfer 
Station is operated by members of the Highway Division. 

The DPW Special Collections are conducted twice yearly at 
the Transfer Station. They accept oil based paints and 
related products, car batteries, fluorescent bulbs, and 
tires. The fall collection is held in conjunction with the 
Health Department's Household Hazardous Waste Collection 
Day to better serve residents. 

SANITATION 

DPW spends much time educating residents that each pound of 
recyclable material that is diverted from the trash stream 
is a reduction in our costs, since the Town is charged a 
fixed fee for pickup of recyclables and a tipping fee for 
every pound of trash. The total tonnage of solid waste 
picked up in calendar year 2006 (4423 tons) decreased by 
698 tons over that collected in 2005 (5121 tons) , a 
decrease of 16% and a savings to the town of over $60,000. 

SNOW AND ICE OPERATIONS 

The winter of 2005/2006 was a challenge for the Town 
employees who worked to keep the roads and public sidewalks 
safe and passable. The cost for snow and ice operations 
exceeded the budgeted amount by $171,175. 



55 



Access to homes by emergency response vehicles is the first 
priority for Town crews during snow and ice operations. 
Sidewalks in close proximity to schools are also a high 
priority for snow removal, due to the reduction in students 
being transported by the Town' s bus contractor and the 
resultant increase in students walking to school. 



******** 



PLANT & FACILITIES OPERATIONS 

Joseph Lucido, Director of Plant and Facilities 

The Plant & Facilities Department continues to address the 
day-to-day building operational functions of the Town and 
Middle/High School. We have worked on some major projects 
this year including reconstructing the lean-to equipment 
shed for the Cemetery Division. We have installed high 
efficiency lighting in the Highway Garage to maximize the 
amount of work light available and minimize the energy cost 
to the Town. We have recently relocated all of the E-911 
communications lines from the former Town Hall into the 
Police Station on Elm Street. With a great deal of help 
from the Highway Division, a new parking area was created 
at the rear of the Public Library. We have watched the 
Whipple Annex being transformed into residential units as 
well as took part in securing grant money to create a 
"Green Roof" for the Annex Project. 

On the School side, we completed an in depth Energy Survey 
and identified a number of deficiencies within the Middle 
School/High School building. We have already done some 
preliminary "air sealing" which will prevent air leakage, 
therefore, requiring less energy to heat and cool the 
building. Next year we hope to address some additional 
items as well. 

We will continue to provide the essential services needed 
to maintain and preserve the infrastructure of our Town and 
School buildings and facilities. We will also continue to 
look at needed long-range capital improvements. 



56 



******** 



CEMETERIES /PARKS DEPARTMENT 

James Graffum, Superintendent 

This department is responsible for the care and maintenance 
of nine cemeteries and seven parks plus all Town commons, 
the Ipswich resident side of Crane Beach and boardwalk, and 
Pavilion Beach. In addition, we maintain all Town-owned 
open space, Strawberry Hill (Wendel Estate), and the Dow 
Brook Conservation Area located on High Street near the 
Ipswich-Rowley town line. 

As winter weather permits, Bakers Pond and the Bialek Park 
rink area are plowed off to accommodate skaters. 

The staff also provides assistance to the Public Works 
Department in snow removal operations and sanding, plus any 
emergency situation as needed. 

We also aid the Town Clerk in setting up voting equipment 
at the polls, and tables, etc., for the semi-annual Town 
meeting . 

In addition to their regular duties, the Cemetery staff 
recently constructed a new 22 'X 40' steel arch equipment 
storage building and replaced the roof to the garage area 
of the Cemetery building. 

There were eighty-three interments in 2006. 

Revenue 

Chapel Tent: $1,500.00 

Foundations: 7,071.00 

Openings: 3 8,400.00 

Perpetual Care: 12,500.00 

Sale of Lots: 15, 000.00 

Total $74,471.00 



57 



******** 



DEPARTMENT OF CODE ENFORCEMENT - James A. Sperber, Director 
JANUARY 1, 2 006 TO DECEMBER 31, 2006 



Category / 
Construction 


#of 
Permits 


Total Fees 


Value of Work 


Additions 


43 


$33, 047.00 


$4, 605, 100.00 


Attached Accessory- 


2 


$180.00 


$7, 000.00 


Certificate of 
Occupancy- 


63 


$1,450.00 


N/A 


Commercial - New 


2 


$17, 970.00 


$2,560, 000.00 


Commercial - Alter. 


1 


$60.00 


$2, 000.00 


Decks & Porches 


37 


$2,890.00 


$282, 050.00 


Demo & Reconstruct 


14 


$21, 990.00 


$3,111, 100.00 


Demolition 


12 


$420.00 


$73,400.00 


Detached Accessory 


47 


$3,663.00 


$298, 888.95 


Fence 


9 


$435.0 


$35,665.00 


Multi-Family Dwelling 


2 


$18,257.70 


$2,743, 950.08 


Miscellaneous 


15 


$1, 183 .50 


$140,370.00 


Remodel /Alteration 


201 


$34,641.30 


$4,651,717.00 '■ 


Repair 


44 


$2,952.80 


$291,422.00 


Roofs, Siding, 
Windows 


290 


$25,949.71 


$2,822,032.88 


Single Family 
Attached 


4 


$11,580.00 


$1,640,000.00 


Single Family 
Dwelling 


15 


$39,844.17 


$5,631,392.00 


Sign 


26 


$930.00 


$19,521.00 


Stove 


13 


$770. 00 


$31, 751.69 


Swimming Pools 


11 


$1,293.00 


$133, 800.00 


Tents 


111 


N/A 


$194, 375 . 00 


Totals 


962 


$219, 507.18 


$29,275,535.60 


Plumbing Total Fees 


Gas Total Fees 


386 $26, 


280. 00 
58 


234 


$10, 990.00 



** As in prior years, fees for plumbing and gas permits are 
split 50%/ 50% for the salary of Plumbing / Gas Inspector 
Robert Hyde and the Town of Ipswich. 

Please remember that building permits are required for not 
only new construction, but for repairs and replacement of 
existing structures, decks, sheds, signs, & fences also. 
If you have any question about whether your project may 
require a building permit, please call our office at 978- 
356-6605. Thank you . 

******** 
HEALTH DEPARTMENT - Colleen E. Fermon, Health Agent 
Following is the yearly report of activities for 2006: 



Licenses and Permits Issued 

Food Service 66 

Retail Food 26 

Caterer 8 

Temporary Food 3 2 

Mobile Food 5 

Frozen Desserts 2 
Disposal System Permits 127 

Biological Haulers 1 

Septic Haulers 20 

Septic Installers 54 

Septic System Inspectors 31 

Swimming Pools 10 

Recreational Camps 6 

Massage Practitioners 24 

Massage Establishments 7 

Tanning Facilities 2 

Motels 2 

Tobacco 2 

Funeral Directors 2 

Bottling 1 
Health Inspections and 
Investigations 

Food Service Inspections 195 

Housing Inspections 14 
Nuisance & Environmental 

Complaints 3 

Percolation Tests 55 

Deep Hole Observations 140 

Septic System Inspections 381 



Swimming Pool Inspections 10 
Surface Water Testing 95 



Sealer of Weights 

& Measures Inspections 

Liquid Measuring Meters 69 
Scales & Balances 101 

Scanners 



59 



Community Health 



Immunization and Clinics 



Public Health Follow-up 



Influenza 


410 


Lyme Disease 


47 


Pneumonia 


1 


Camphylobactor 


3 


Tetanus 


4 


Varicella 


3 


Well Elderly 


12 


Salmonella 


2 


Clinics 












Babesiosis 


4 






Hepatitis B 


2 






Hepatitis C 


1 






Cryptosporidium 


1 






LTBI 


2 






Giardia 


1 






Streptococcus 


1 






Pertussis 


2 



Board of Health Septic System Regulations and Fee Schedule 
were amended in 2006. Board of Health 
Members: Susan Hubbard, Chairperson, Carl 
Hiltunen and Dr. Spencer Amesbury. 



******** 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Robert A. Gambale, Chairman 
Dana P. Jordan, Vice-Chair 



In 2006, a total of forty-seven petitions were submitted to the 
Zoning Board of Appeals: twenty-seven special permit requests, 
all but two of which were granted and three were withdrawn; 
thirteen variance requests, all but three were granted and three 
were withdrawn; six appeals of the Building Inspector's 
decision, two were upheld, two were overturned, one withdrawn 
and one continued to 2007. 

The Board granted a Comprehensive Permit under Chapter 4 0B for 
the proposal to construct fourteen residential rental units, of 
which 25% would be affordable, at 43 Avery Street. The public 
hearing review process required ten months. 



60 



The Board granted the request of Two Rivers, LLC to withdraw 
without prejudice its application for a Comprehensive Permit 
under Chapter 40B for a residential development at 187 County 
Road. 

The Board granted a Comprehensive Permit under Chapter 4 OB to 
Ipswich Pines to construct forty residential condominium 
townhouses, of which ten will be affordable, at 82 Topsfield 
Road. The public hearing review process required twelve months. 

In 2004, the Board granted a Comprehensive Permit under Chapter 
4 OB to the YMCA of the North Shore, Inc. (Powder House Village) 
to develop forty-eight affordable residential rental units in 
two buildings at 108 and 112 County; this proposal remains in 
litigation. 

The Zoning Board of Appeals is five-member adjudicatory body 
appointed by the Board of Selectman. Member Kevin Lombard was 
re-appointed; as were Associate Members Robert Bodwell and 
Timothy Perkins . 

The Board extends appreciation to Jim Sperber, Code Enforcement 
Officer and his Assistant Eric Colville and Marie Rodgers , 
Administrative Assistant for their support. 

******** 
DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT - Glenn C. Gibbs , Director 

PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT 

Glenn C. Gibbs, Director 

The Department of Planning & Development is responsible for 
guiding the development and conservation of land in the 
Town of Ipswich, both through the regulatory process and 
through the development and implementation of long-range 
plans. It does this in part by providing support and 
guidance for each of the boards and commissions within its 
directorate: the Planning Board, the Conservation 
Commission, the Historical Commission, and the Affordable 
Housing Partnership (reports on their activities are given 
below) . The Department also provides support to the Open 
Space Committee, the Affordable Housing Trust Fund Board, 
and various ad hoc committees. Listed below are some of 
the initiatives undertaken by the Department in 2006: 



61 



> Shepherded $713,000 enhancement grant application for the 
North Green Improvement Project through the Mass Highway 
approval process. Funding for the improvements, which 
will include new sidewalks on North Main and Meetinghouse 
Green, curbs to protect the green from vehicular damage, 
an organized parking layout, historic lighting, and a 
reduction of street width to improve pedestrian safety 
was recently approved by MHD. Final design of the 
improvements is expected to begin by the fall of 2007; 

> After discovering that a portion of the Elm Street 
Municipal Lot was owned by the Historical Society, helped 
to broker a deal, approved by the fall Town Meeting, 
under which the Society will transfer the property to the 
Town in exchange for the establishment of pedestrian 
access from the lot to the Heard House; 

> Under the direction of the Open Space Program Manager, 
acquired the fee of the following open space parcels, 
which are now permanently protected from development: 

• 85.5 acres of important salt marsh and coastal 
wildlife habitat on Great Neck, owned by the 
Proprietors of Great Neck, Inc.; 

• 44 acres of critical wildlife habitat with a half 
mile of frontage on the lower Ipswich River, located 
off Topsfield Road; 

• 22.5 acres on Pineswamp Road, which includes the 
summit of Turkey Hill and its distant views of the 
coast . 

The total purchase price for the three properties was 
$2.1 million, but thanks to the Department's grant 
writing efforts, the Town's total cost was under 
$900,000, a cost reduction of more than 50%; 

> Under the direction of the Stewardship Coordinator, 
undertook a variety of stewardship efforts, including: 
completion of the parking area at the Dow Brook 
Conservation Area on High Street and the preparation of a 
grant to fund a portion of the trail development; 
establishment of a Land Stewards Program and a database 
of volunteers interested in participating; 
identification of funding source for construction of an 
additional ball field on Mile Lane; introduction of 
multi- lingual signage at Nichols field to address ongoing 
property misuse; and drafting of land management Plans 



62 



for the Linebrook Woods and Great Neck Conservation 
Areas ; 



> Drafted zoning articles for fall town meeting, including 
one that modified the definition of affordable housing, 
thus making affordable units more affordable to a greater 
number of households; 

> Pursued grant funding to support a variety of planning 
initiatives, including a grant to convert a vacant 
carriage house into an affordable dwelling unit, and a 
grant to facilitate the development of a wayfinding sign 
program for the town; 

> Through the efforts of a graduate landscaping design 
student, developed a conceptual improvement plan for a 
pocket park along the river across from the former Town 
Hall, as well as the green space between the Visitor's 
Center and the Heard House along South Main Street . 

In September of this year, the Department welcomed Thomas 
Bentley as its new Affordable Housing Coordinator. Tom, 
who has many years of experience in the affordable housing 
field, will be working closely with the Housing Partnership 
and the Affordable Housing Trust Fund Board on affordable 
housing initiatives. 

******** 

PLANNING BOARD 

Tim Purinton, Chair 

The year 2006 saw a shift in the composition of the Board. 
Co-chair Charles Allen stepped down after five years of 
service and was replaced by Jim Manzi. Charlie's able 
leadership will be missed as will his deep knowledge of 
affordable housing issues. Tim Purinton assumed the sole 
chairmanship of the Board. John Soininen, Bob Weatherall 
and Mike Ryan continued as full board members, with Emily 
Levin serving as associate member. 

Planning Matters 
Ipswich continues to grow and change at a steady rate; and 
the Board, through proactive planning, tried to effect 
growth in such a way as to enhance and preserve Ipswich's 
unique community character. The Community Development Plan 



63 



(CDP) continues to be our blueprint for action; and to 
ensure consistency with the plan, staff has initiated a 
consistency review checklist for permitted projects. 

The Board sponsored two zoning articles at Town Meeting. Both 
were adopted and approved by the Attorney General. One article 
substantially improves access to affordable housing, 
especially for renters. The other article clarifies and 
improves miscellaneous provisions in the zoning bylaw, 
including a zoning map revision, that better accommodates the 
redevelopment of the Old Town Hall. 

Regulatory Matters 
The year 2006 was a moderately active year in this area. 
Projects reviewed and approved in 2 006 include: 

Subdivisions 

• Willowdale Circle at Roberts Road (an 8-lot open 
space preservation zoning development) 

• a two-lot subdivision off of Paradise Road (definitive 
subdivision) 

Site Plan Review 

• Former Town Hall property at 3 South Main Street 

• 55 Mitchell Road (storage facility) 
Special Permits 

• 87 High Street, 152 County Road, 36 High Street, and 
98 Central Street (accessory dwellings) 

• 12 Perley Ave (infill unit) 

• 3 0A, 3 5 and 61 Mitchell Road and 85 Turnpike were 
issued permits for various boat and automobile repair 
operations 

Scenic Road Applications 

• 130 Argilla Road 

• 41 Candlewood Road 

• 3 87 Linebrook Road 

The Board also reviewed and endorsed ten applications for 
ANR (Approval Not Required under Subdivision Control Law) 
plans . 

The Board recognizes (and wishes great luck to) Bob Puff, 
the Planning Board's consulting engineer, for years of 
excellent service to the Town. In his place, the Board has 
entered into consulting contracts with three firms to 
ensure that technical engineering aspects of development 



64 



applications meet our rigorous standards for protecting the 
Town's neighborhoods, infrastructure and environment. 

Finally, the Board wishes once again to thank Glenn Gibbs, 
Director of Planning and Development, and Kate Day, 
Assistant Planner, for their tireless assistance on our 
behalf. 

*•*•*■**** 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

David Standley, Chair 

Jennifer Hughes, Vice Chair 

David Pancoast, Conservation Agent 

Frances I. Doyle, Recording Secretary 

The Conservation Commission is composed of seven appointed 
residents who serve as unpaid volunteers. They are David 
Standley, Jennifer Hughes, Glenn Wood, Ann McMenemy, 
Barbara Beaman, Sissy ffolliott and Brian O'Neill. During 
2006, there were two Associate Members, Cynthia Ingelfinger 
and Sharon Cushing. Cynthia stepped down during the year, 
with the Commission's gratitude for her valuable input and 
assistance during her time of service. 

The Commission serves the public and Town regarding land 
conservation and preservation activities in the community; 
but most of its time is occupied with its formal role as 
the local environmental regulatory board under the 
Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act and the Ipswich 
Wetlands Protection Bylaw, both of which focus on water 
resource regulations. The Commission's 2006 efforts in land 
acquisition and management of open space continued in 
concert with the Open Space Committee, the Board of 
Selectmen, the Open Space Program Manager, and the Open 
Space Stewardship Coordinator. The acquisition of 
properties on Great Neck, Pineswamp Road and Topsfield Road 
were all finalized or advanced toward imminent conclusion. 
Several Conservation Restrictions were either accepted 
directly by the Commission or approved by it (as required 
by law) where they were to be held by other entities. 

In 2006, the Commission continued regulatory oversight of 
several complex ongoing projects, including aspects of the 
New England Biolabs' project on County Road and the Turner 
Hill development. Additionally, it heard applications 
related to the significant revamping of the wastewater 



65 



collection and disposal system for the entire isthmus of 
Little Neck, several Chapter 40B affordable housing 
projects, and various appeals of past decisions. The 
Commission also addressed over 200 matters in 2006, 
including 140 official filings and scheduled citizens 
queries, as shown in the table, as well as numerous 
emergencies and ongoing violations that are not tabulated 
below. The list compares the 2006 permitting activities 
with the previous six calendar years, to indicate trends 
and changes in the various tabulated categories, and shows 
the average number of permitting activities over the seven 
year period between 2000 and 2006. 



Activity 


200 



200 

1 


200 
2 


200 
3 


200 
4 


200 
5 


200 
6 


Avg 


Orders of 

Conditions/ 

Amendments 


40 


43 


40 


39 


61 


56 


31 


44 


Orders Resource 
Area Delineation 





5 


2 


7 


3 


4 


1 


3 


Determinations of 
Applicability 


45 


27 


21 


33 


41 


31 


22 


31 


Certificates of 
Compliance 


13 


24 


17 


17 


18 


21 


28 


20 


Extension Permits 


14 


12 


4 


5 


6 


6 


10 


8 


Enforcement 
Actions 


10 


8 


7 


15 


17 


13 


11 


12 


Other* 


44 


36 


46 


39 


67 


49 


37 


45 


Totals 


166 


155 


137 


155 


213 


180 


140 


164 



* "Other" includes various official filings not tabulated in categories, such 
as Emergency Certifications & Minor Modifications, as well as scheduled 
Citizens' Queries 

To accomplish the permitting process, Commission members 
attended 22 regularly scheduled evening meetings, visited 
numerous projects and fielded dozens of Citizens' Queries. 
Staff continues to respond to hundreds of routine queries, 
and to inspect all proposed project sites before hearings 
and during project activities. 

Significant precipitation in May of 2006 caused severe 
flooding throughout Ipswich, washing out culverts and 
bridge footings and abutments. This damage required the 
Commission to focus on rapid restoration of waterway 
crossings and drainage ways, to enable the community to get 
back on its feet. The Commission handled regulatory 



66 



matters related to three major bridges in Town, and 
numerous culverts and road washout situations. The 
Commission participated in the initial stages of the Miles 
River Restoration project, involving multiple communities 
along the entire length of that waterway, with a goal of 
restoring flows affected by various factors and changes 
over the years. The Commission continues to deal with the 
complex issue of appropriate responses to environmental 
changes resulting from beaver activity. In 2006 several 
informal assessments of beaver activity in certain areas of 
Town were conducted by the Commission Chair and one multi- 
site project to install flow control devices was approved 
and implemented. Although a satisfactory unified 
methodology of dealing with this beaver activity increase 
for the entire Town has not yet been achieved, the 
Commission remains committed to working with other boards 
to address the management of this increased activity. 




An example of the flood damage on Linebrook Road 
at the Richards' property 

******** 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Peter J. Lampropoulos , Chairman 

The major effort of the Historical Commission in 2006 was 
revising and printing the Partial List of Historic 
Buildings in Ipswich, Massachusetts , For Use In 
Implementing The Demolition Delay Bylaw with the assistance 
of Susan S. Nelson of Goodship Research. This listing is a 



67 



valuable tool in identifying properties that would benefit 
from the protection of the demolition delay bylaw. 

The demolition delay bylaw was invoked twice during 2006. 
A circa 1734 house at 44 Fellows Road could not be saved in 
its entirety; but the Commission is working with the 
parties involved to develop a list of salvageable 
historical features to be incorporated into a new home. 
The Fahey Workshop/Barn at 80 East has been identified as 
the Glover Mill, a vital link to Ipswich's textile past. An 
effort has been launched to find another site in Ipswich 
for the mill, with the goal of restoring it and making it 
accessible to the public. 

The Historical Commission appointed member Marjorie Robie 
to serve on the town committee dealing with the damage done 
to the Town's three major historic bridges in May 2006. 
The purpose of her role was to insure that repairs to the 
bridges were done in a manner that was as historically 
accurate as possible. 

A green roof was added to the Whipple Annex on Green 
Street. A penthouse built to provide access to the new 
roof violated the preservation agreement, which prohibits 
major exterior architectural alterations without Commission 
approval . The Commission investigated and reported to the 
Board of Selectmen that a violation existed. Ultimately, 
the Board of Selectmen allowed the structure to remain,- but 
it was modified per discussion with the Commission to 
minimize its visual impact. 



******** 



HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 

Michael Schaaf, Chairman 

Under the leadership of Chairman Michael Schaaf, the 
Ipswich Affordable Housing Partnership had another 
productive and successful year. The 65 -page Ipswich 
Affordable Housing Plan was submitted to the state and 
approved. The approval gives the Town greater authority 
relative to 40B developments in town. Specifically, if in 
the future 41 units of affordable housing are provided 
within one year, the ZBA will be able to halt any 40B 
project for a twelve-month period. 



68 






With the addition of 11 units to the state's Subsidized 
Housing Inventory (SHI) in 2006, the number of such 
affordable units in Ipswich is now 430, or just under 8% of 
the Town's housing stock. The Ipswich Affordable Housing 
Plan projects that the percentage of the Town's housing 
listed on the SHI could reach 10% by the end of 2008, which 
would meet the state's threshold and increase local control 
over future development. 

Oversight of the development of affordable housing 
dominated the 2006 agenda of the Housing Partnership. 
Working with the North Shore Housing Trust, an application 
to the state's Housing Development Support Program (HDSP) 
was submitted in November. The $200,000 grant would 
subsidize the conversion of a dilapidated carriage house at 
98 Central Street into a two-bedroom dwelling unit 
affordable to a family earning no more than 70% of the Area 
Median Income. The carriage house is on the same property 
as a two-family affordable condominium acquired in 2005 
with Town assistance, including monies from the Town 
Affordable Housing Trust Fund. One of these affordable 
units was sold in December 2006 to a first-time homebuyer. 
That homebuyer received $6,500 in downpayment assistance 
from the Town. The second unit will be sold at an 
affordable price to an eligible buyer by the spring of 
2007. 

Other initiatives undertaken by the Partnership in 2006 
include : 

> Participated in the selection of a part-time housing 
coordinator to assist the Town in the preservation and 
creation of affordable housing as well as the 
technical responsibilities of monitoring affordable 
housing units recently developed for ownership and 
rental. Tom Bentley filled the position in September; 

> Assisted with the development of a zoning bylaw 
revision that broadened the applicability of an infill 
housing provision and created a meaningful difference 
between market and "affordable" rental rates. The 
infill housing provision was deferred for further 
study, but the latter change was adopted by the fall 
town meeting; 

> Worked with the Owner, Town boards and staff, and 
other parties in an effort to prevent the foreclosure 



69 



(and potential loss) of an affordable housing unit at 
5 Cogswell Street duplexes on Town Farm Road, and a 
proposed 4 OB multi- family apartment building at the 
end of Locust Road. 

Current members of the Partnership are Michael Schaaf, Don 
Bowen, Ed Dick, William "Jay" Gallagher, Don Greenough, 
Michael Jones, and Jim Warner. Staff assistance in 2006 
was provided primarily by Glenn Gibbs, Tom Bentley, and 
Marie Rodgers . 

******** 

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES - Elizabeth M. Dorman, 
Director 

RECREATION DEPARTMENT 

Elizabeth M. Dorman, Recreation Director 

The Recreation Department continued its mission to maintain 
a variety of programs, services, and activities to enhance 
the social, physical, and emotional well being of all our 
citizens. Our starfish logo seen on staff shirts and 
newsletters symbolizes our efforts to make a difference in 
the lives of local children and families. 

Community events included the July 4th parade & field day, 
a Halloween parade & program, and parades on Memorial Day 
and Veterans' Day organized by local veterans' groups. 
Programs featured an outdoor concert by the West Newbury 
Volunteer Fire Association Band as well as two by the 
Ipswich Community Band, a UNH Caravan Show, a magic show by 
Rich Nunziato on our annual "Harry Potter's Birthday" 
celebration, and a Kids Dog Show with a demonstration by 
the Old Colony Obedience Club. 

Summer offerings included tennis lessons at the high school 
courts, golf lessons at Ipswich Country Club, Workreation 
job training and social events for young teens, Jr. Summer 
Fun, our annual youth Sand Sculpture Day at Crane's Beach, 
and drop-in activities at Bialek Park with optional field 
trips. Swim lessons were contracted at the YMCA, and 
resident lot parking attendants were funded at Crane's 
Beach . 



70 




Spring activities included after school programs with 
homework and computer projects, crafts, adventure and 
sports activities, chess, cooking, quilting and knitting 
projects, and weekly off -site trips to museums, movies, 
mini-golf, and bowling activities. April vacation 
activities included "Trailblazers" outdoor adventures, 
"Twilight Zones" to learn about our senses, "Making Movies" 
at Town Hall and seeing one in a theatre, and "Around the 
World in 6 Hours" including games and languages of other 
cultures. Winter programs included two learn-to-ski 
programs for grades 3-5 and 6-8 and February vacation week 
adventures including our annual Harry Potter Day. Golf 
classes were again offered at the Rowley Country Club for 
children during spring and fall seasons. A new Friday Fun 
Night program began in the fall for school aged children to 
enjoy crafts, gym games, and special events. Adult 
activities included free volleyball and ping pong sessions 
as well as user funded classes in bridge, sewing, and 
knitting. Mom & Tot classes were offered with music and 
crafts activities. 

Town Hall facilities including a program room, kitchen and 
snack bar area, cafeteria/lounge, crafts room, and 
gymnasium were scheduled by the Recreation Department so a 
number of local sports, scouts, and social service agencies 
could hold meetings and offer programs for residents of all 
ages. Gym space was shared by many youth basketball teams 
including the YMCA in the winter, wrestling during the 
summer, and cheerleading in the fall. 



71 



A donation was received from the Friends of Ipswich 
Athletics to provide seed money for playground equipment to 
be designed and funded over the next several years for the 
Bialek Park site that was constructed in 1989. Other 
donations made it possible to schedule installation of a 
new gym floor in the near future. 

The seven-member Recreation Commission and Recreation 
Director met regularly throughout the year to discuss 
programs, facilities, and policies as well as to plan for 
the future. Members continued to volunteer at a number of 
programs . 

******** 

YOUTH SERVICES 

Marcia Ford, Youth Director 

Youth services in Ipswich are dedicated to improving the 
lives of Ipswich youth by offering a number of varied 
programs to meet recreational, academic, and social needs of 
this unique population. Our foundation continues to be 
community collaboration, and many programs were developed as 
joint ventures with other local agencies in direct response 
to community needs. 

Community service projects were organized for volunteer 
teens, church and Scouts groups, and those referred through 
the local courts and Juvenile Diversion programs. They were 
involved in cleaning and painting projects including the 
temporary skateboard area at Bialek Park. Others provided 
help with our youth programs and some services for needy 
senior citizens. 

After school clubs continued, led by local students and 
experts recruited to teach a variety of classes. Homework 
sessions led by staff and supportive volunteers were 
incorporated into the daily programs, and inter- 
generational experiences with senior citizens helping to 
teach children knitting and quilting. Thursday early 
release days provided opportunities for field trips to 
various educational and recreational sites. 

Talk To A Friend, our peer leadership program for Ipswich 
Youth, met weekly to receive training on current youth issues 
and discuss their relationships with peers and family 
members.. Many of them helped chaperone activities for 
younger children, assumed some mentoring and mediation 



72 



responsibilities, and organized intergeneration suppers with 
local senior citizens. 

The Zone Cafe continued serving as a focal point for teen 
programs, and a web site was developed to survey local 
teens' suggestions about new programs and activities. Middle 
School drop- in nights continued weekly to serve younger 
teens. The student -operated snack bar provided on site 
training in retail sales and management while offering 
reasonably price items to attendees. 




Family advocacy services were provided on an as -needed basis 
to families in need who met with the youth director to 
determine their current needs and secure connections to 
available services. Regular meetings provided further 
monitoring and coordination of related services. In addition, 
the director was available for after-hours' support and 
crisis intervention for at-risk families. 

Regular training sessions were provided for summer and school 
year staff members to maintain their skills in safety 
practices, basic first aid, motivation of students, conflict 
resolution, and group management. The outdoor project 
adventure site continued to serve as team building resource 
and field trip destination for many of our program groups. 



73 



******** 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Diane Mitchell, Director 

A wide variety of programs for senior citizens of Ipswich 
were provided under the umbrella of Council on Aging 
Services . 

A senior center operated weekdays, 8:00-4:00, at the Town 
Hall. Three part-time receptionists welcomed guests, 
answered the phone, and assisted with the daily operation 
of the center. 

Regular programs included the Silver Strands choral group, 
a book discussion group, bridge and card groups, knitting 
and quilting groups, art classes, and a monthly lunch club. 
Health-related programs included monthly health screenings, 
weekly blood pressure clinics, a monthly nutrition program, 
massage, hearing clinics, Yoga, Tai Chi, Reikki, tennis, 
exercise and line dancing classes, and a swimming group. 
The COA Travel Club attended an overseas trip sponsored by 
the Friends of the Ipswich Elderly and day trips to various 
locations were held throughout the year. 

Special offerings included inter-generational programs, a 
dining program, a relaxation techniques seminar, a memory 
loss screening, a reverse mortgage seminar, free 
cardiovascular screenings, a stroke prevention workshop, an 
Elderlaw Education program, a summer picnic, a North Shore 
Youth Symphony recital, computer clinics, speakers on a 
variety of health, financial and legal issues, social 
gatherings for special observances, and classes for a wide 
range of interests. A monthly newsletter written by the 
Director reached 2,000 elder households through support of 
local advertisers and a grant for postage. A Caregivers 
Support Group helped those dealing with frail elders. The 
Director continued to coordinate the Senior Citizen 
Property Tax Work-Off Program. A seven-member TRIAD Council 
was formed. This group consists of local law enforcement 
and seniors together and will offer safety awareness 
programs geared towards elders within our community. 

A handicapped accessible, 12 -passenger van provided local 
transportation to Ipswich seniors. Ipswich senior citizens 
were provided over 5,500 one-way rides on the COA van, 
logging approximately 18,000 miles of service. The Friends 



74 



group continued to raise funds and support projects that 
fell outside of the COA budget. The Friends also 
contributed to a Christmas party for 190 seniors held in 
the gymnasium of the town hall. Grants from the Executive 
Office of Elder Affairs and the Coburn Charitable Society 
provided a part-time administrative assistant, a part-time 
activities coordinator, and a volunteer recognition 
luncheon. 

The Outreach program enlisted a corps of 3 5 volunteers who 
provided 1,780 hours of volunteer service to local elders. 
This program also provided volunteers who drove senior 
citizens 16,221 miles to out-of-town medical appointments. 
Other services of the Outreach program included social 
visits, phone calls, help with chores, and guidance in 
making personal, medical, housing and financial decisions. 
Other assistance programs included Money Management and 
Bill Paying for elders and free income tax preparation 
provided by trained AARP volunteers . 

A seven-member council met monthly to review programs and 
operations and plan additional offerings. 




The ladies enjoyed a special hat event 



75 



******** 

EASTERN ESSEX DISTRICT 
DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS' SERVICES 

Terrance P. Hart 
District Director 

This department is charged under Chapter 115 Massachusetts 
General Laws with providing services to veterans, their 
survivors and dependents . Principle workload under state 
law includes the administration of aid to veterans and 
dependents. Communities fund this program, which is 
subsequently 75% reimbursed the following fiscal year by 
the Commonwealth. This is a need-based program; and the 
department is required to conduct periodic comprehensive 
review of the cases to insure no substantive facts have 
changed, while working with the veteran to identify 
alternative or long-term solutions to individual 
circumstances. During the calendar year, 18 Ipswich 
veterans/widows were on this program for varying periods. 
Under state law, the department also assists qualified 
veterans to obtain bonuses, and qualified veterans, widows 
and parents to obtain state annuities, property tax 
abatements, and other benefits. 

The Veterans' Services program also mandates extensive 
interaction within the federal community, principally with 
the Department of Veterans' Affairs. The Veterans' Service 
Officer (VSO) assists veterans and their dependents in 
filing for pensions, service connected injury/ illness 
compensation, dependency indemnity compensation for 
survivors, VA healthcare enrollment, insurance claims, 
decedent claims, and many other issues. Federal benefits 
processed by this department are paid directly to those 
eligible to receive the assistance or entitlement. The VA 
sent approximately $1.25 million to eligible recipients in 
Ipswich, of which the current staff is responsible for 
approximately $602,000 dollars paid to or saved by those 
assisted in Ipswich. 

Additionally, the department interacts within the federal 
community to correct military records, obtain needed 
documentation, and insure veterans/dependents receive 
awards and recognition to which entitled. The VSO provided 
information, advice or assistance to 119 of the Town' s 
1,139 identified veterans and 20 of the 291 identified 



76 



veterans' widows during 2006. We also provide support and 
information assistance for National Guard and Reserves 
called up for service in Iraq or Afghanistan and their 
families . 

The Director and the Assistant to the Director, Georgia 
Gadbois, advocate for veterans on issues at the local, 
state and federal level; interact with elected and 
appointed officials on issues; and work with local 
organizations in serving the community. Key state 
legislation passed in 2006 included an increase in tax 
abatements for service connected disabled veterans. The 
department assisted the Ipswich War Memorial Committee in 
improving town memorials, and provided historical research 
for various individuals and organizations. The department 
also provided information, assistance and guidance for 
senior citizens in determining their needs for Medicare D 
insurance . 

The Eastern Essex District is composed of the Towns of 
Essex, Georgetown, Hamilton, Ipswich, Rowley, Wenham and 
West Newbury. A Board of Directors consisting of one 
selectman (or designee) from each town maintains oversight. 
Mr. James Foley is the Ipswich member of the Board of 
Directors . 

******** 
UTILITIES DEPARTMENT - Tim Henry - Director 

ELECTRIC DIVISION 

Carl Lemiesz - Operations Manager 

A new position of Electric Operations Manager was created 
this year; and Carl Lemiesz, who came on board in March of 
this year, filled the position. The department also hired a 
new Business Manager, Mark Cousins, who started in January. 
The spring also saw the retirement of Bill Ford as Power 
Plant Superintendent after 2 years of service to the Town. 

In October of 2006, the Light Department entered into the 
ISO's (Independent System Operator) Forward Reserve Market 
with 8 MW's of the Power Plant's generation assets. Under 
this program, the department is paid for being available 
for dispatch within 30 minutes of notification, Monday 
through Friday. The operation of the plant in this market 



77 



is being overseen by Bob Stone who assumed the duties of 
Assistant Power Plant Superintendent in 2006. 

A new energy peak was set on August 13, 2006, when we used 
27.9 mwh of electricity. This was a 5% increase over the 
2005 peak of 26.6 mwh used on July 26, 2005, which was the 
previous all time peak. 

Kwh sales 

2005 sales 106,427,000 

2006 sales 106,744,000 

******** 

WATER DIVISION - Tim Henry - Manager 

Vicki Halmen - Town Engineer 

Joyce Kippen Water Plant Superintendent 

Total water pumping was reduced to a 17 year low in 2006. 
The department actively promotes water conservation 
measures and continued the seasonal rate structure which 
was started in 2003 to curb excessive summer water use. In 
2006, the department was awarded a Water Loss Prevention 
Grant by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental 
Protection. This grant will help identify and reduce 
unaccounted for water loss within the water system and 
promote water conservation. 

The Green/Summer Street water main replacement project was 
completed in early 2006. Approximately 3,000 feet of new 
ductile iron water main was installed to replace the 
existing 100+-year-old cast iron pipes. 

The Water Treatment Plant became fully staffed in 2006 with 
the addition of Phil McCarthy who joined the staff after 13 
years with the Town of Reading Water Plant. Phil has a 
Grade 4T Drinking Water Operators License. 

NEW MAINS 

There were three (3) extensions to the distribution system 
in 2006 : 

• Beaulieu Lane (Off Kimball Avenue) - 270 feet of 6" 
CLDI pipe 

• Mary's Way (185-189 Topsfield Road) - 390 feet of 6" 
CLDI pipe 



78 







21 






4 






16 




1, 


, 510 




496, 


,405 




4, 


,611 


96 


Fire Lines 


k) 




202 






61 






28 






33 






35 






21 



• Ipswich Pines (82 Topsfield Road) - 850 feet of 8" 
CLDI pipe 

2006 

New Domestic Services 

Hydrants Installed 

Hydrants Replaced 

New Water Mains Installed (ft) 

Total Length of Mains (ft) 

Water Services 

Metered Services 
Unmetered Services 

Water Usage (Million Gallons) 

Reservoirs (Dow and Bull Brook 

Brown's Well 

Essex Road Well 

Fellows Road Well 

Mile Lane Well 

Winthrop Wells 

Total Water Usage (MG) 380 

******** 

WASTEWATER DIVISION 

Patrick J Brennan, Superintendent 

After thirty plus years of service to the Town of Ipswich 
at the Wastewater Treatment Plant, Superintendent John A. 
Quigley decided it was time to play more golf and spend 
time with the grandchildren. On May 8, 2006, John retired. 
We all wish him well in the future. 

Patrick Brennan was selected to succeed Mr. Quigley as 
Superintendent of the Treatment Plant. Mr. Brennan has a 
grade 7 operations certification and was currently an 
operator at the plant. He has previous experience operating 
Treatment Facilities through out New England. 

The elevation of Mr. Brennan to Superintendent opened an 
operator position, which was filled by Scott Yaffe. Scott 
has a grade 6 certification and spent the last nine years 
as Chief Operator of the Waste Treatment Facility for West 
Lynn Creamery. 



79 



The Great Rains of "06" (May 13 and 14) provided many 
challenges for the Wastewater Plant and its staff. Pumping 
capacity at the Town Warf Pump Station, which transfers all 
sewage flow from the town to the Treatment Plant, was 
tested to the limit with three pumps running at full speed 
for ten days, pumping close to four million gallons per 
day. This flow far exceeds any previous periods. The extra 
flow was made possible with the replacement of the pumps 
and force main in 2002. The Treatment Plant Process 
preformed exceptionally throughout the high flow period 
maintaining a high quality discharge. Again this can be 
attributed to previous management making the necessary, 
although sometimes costly, upgrades to the plant. While 
most plants in the general area were maxed out, we were 
able to help out septage haulers throughout the area, 
providing a place to dump their trucks as they franticly 
tried to pump out flooded septage systems. Three Hundred 
and fifty thousand gallons of septage were received in the 
five days following the storm with no reduction in the 
plant discharge quality. Throughout this period, the plant 
operators and Town Engineer Vicki Halmen closely monitored 
the sewer collection system to avoid any residential 
backups . 




A new Silverado Hybrid pickup truck was purchased for plant and 
collection system duties throughout the Town. 



80 



Addressing exceedances of our NPDES permit remained our 
number one priority in 2006. Copper and pH exceedances were 
eliminated with the help of an outside chemical vendor and 
an extensive on site pilot program performed by the plant 
staff. Fecal coliform problems continue to plague us 
though. Much effort was put into correcting this situation, 
and we have limited it to a small portion of the year we 
were unable to eliminate it. Plans are being made to 
correct this situation in the coming year. Fecal coliform 
is at this time our only permit issue. 

Significant Data from 2006 

• 415 Million gallons of wastewater were treated at our 
Facility this year. 

• 4.9 Million gallons of Septage was received and 
treated. 

• 70.8 inches of rain was recorded, including 21" in May 
and 12" in June. 

• 1,977 tons of bio-solids removed from the wastewater 
stream was dewatered and transported to the Agresource 
Compost Facility for beneficial reuse. 

******** 

FINANCE DIRECTORATE - Rita M. Negri, Finance Director 

ACCOUNTING OFFICE 

Rita M. Negri - Town Accountant 

The Finance Director is the chief financial advisor to the 
Town Manager. She is responsible for the debt service, 
insurance, benefits, and other miscellaneous budgets. She 
submits revenue projections for budget purposes; meets with 
the Town Manager and department heads to review expenditure 
budgets; determines base budgets for the next budget cycle. 
She provides advice to the Selectmen, Finance Committee, 
and School Committee of any significant changes in the 
Town's financial condition and changes in legislation 
affecting municipal finance. 

The Town Accountant's Office consists of two full-time 
staff and a full-time Town Accountant who also serves as 
Finance Director. The Accounting Department is 



81 



responsible for processing the payroll for all employees, 
processing invoices for vendor payments, and preparing all 
W-2's and 1099' s at year-end in accordance with IRS 
regulations . 

The Town Accountant's Office maintains all of the 
accounting records for the Town's revenues and 
expenditures; ensures that reconciliations are performed 
between applicable Town departments; assists in providing 
information on benefits available to employees; and 
oversees the operation of the Town's financial computer 
system. 

The Town Accountant also coordinates the annual independent 
audit of the Town's financial statements that was last 
completed by September 25, 2006, for the year ended June 
30, 2006. The financial results for fiscal year 2006 were 
good. This was due to good collections on receivables, and 
responsible spending of appropriations. 

Free Cash for fiscal year 2006 was certified by the 
Massachusetts Department of Revenue, Division of Local 
Services in September 2006 in the amount of $1,148,214. 



******** 



TREASURER/COLLECTOR 

Kevin A. Merz 
Treasurer/ Col lector 

The Treasurer/Collector is responsible for the investment 
of all Town funds and the collection of Real Estate taxes, 
Personal Property taxes, Motor Vehicle and Boat excise 
taxes. The Treasurer/Collector's office is also 
responsible for all municipal borrowings, balancing cash 
and accounts receivable with the Town Accountant, selling 
beach stickers, processing Municipal Lien Certificates and 
continuing collection efforts of properties in Tax Title. 
Currently, the Treasurer/Collector's office is in the 
process of foreclosing on 19 parcels in Land Court. 

In 2006, the Treasurer/Collector's office sold 5,479 beach 
stickers, 332 fishing stickers and 31 horse stickers. 

In October, the Treasurer/Collector's office began 
accepting passport applications. By the end of December, 
55 passport applications had been accepted. 



82 



Thanks goes out to Don Carter, Corinna Warner and Cori 
Thurlow, the staff in the Treasurer/Collector's office, for 
their dedication, hard work, accuracy and great customer 
service in 2006 . 

******** 

ASSESSORS OFFICE 

Frank J. Ragonese, Chief Assessor 

The total valuation of Real Estate and Personal Property- 
January 1, 2006, was $2,823,627,988. 

The valuation of the Town by Class is: 

Dollars Percent 

Class I Residential 2,548,052,063 90.2404 

Class I_I Open Space 

Class III Commercial 119,312,265 4.2255 

Class IV Industrial 141,201,620 5.0007 

Personal Property 15, 062 , 040 0. 5334 

Total: $2,823,627,988 100.00% 

The Tax Rate for Fiscal Year 2007 was $8.32 per thousand 
for all property classes. 

******** 

TOWN CLERK 

Pamela Z. Carakatsane, CMC 

Town Clerk/Election Administrator 

The Town Clerk's office is the hub of activity in the Town 
Hall. Residents use the Town Clerk as a source of 
information and assistance for nearly all phases of Town 
business . 

As the keeper of the records for the Town, the Town Clerk 
is accountable for the registration of all birth, marriage 
and death records. Town Meeting legislation and 



83 



appropriations, recordings, filings and certification of 
all official actions are the responsibility of the Town 
Clerk. 

Issuance of marriage, dog, raffle, shellfish and sporting 
licenses is another responsibility of the Town Clerk's 
Office. The office processes alcoholic beverage, common 
victualler, Sunday entertainment, weekday entertainment and 
other licenses and permits approved by the Board of 
Selectmen. 

As the Chief Election Official, the Town Clerk has full 
responsibility for the conduct of all elections. The Clerk 
sets up the election officers, polling places and reports 
official election results to the Secretary of State. Also, 
the Clerk serves as the Clerk on the Board of Registrars 
and is the supervisor of voter registration and absentee 
balloting. This year, the Secretary of State selected 
Ipswich to be a site to test the Diebold Handicap 
Accessible Voting Machines during the November State 
Election. Only twelve municipalities were chosen as test 
sites . 

Elected and appointed Town officials and board members are 
administered their oaths of office by the Town Clerk. In 
2006, the office began administering oaths of office, as 
Commissioners to Qualify for Public Office, to those 
appointed by the Governor as Notaries Public, Justices of 
the Peace and other public offices. 

Thanks are extended to Kathy Marini , Assistant Town Clerk; 
volunteer Janet Trask who assists with census and indexing 
of vital records; and volunteer Isobel Coulombe who 
conducts genealogical research. 

Population Statistics 
As of June 30, 2006 - 13,405 

Age Breakdown of Residents as of June 30, 2 006: 



- 


- 5 




628 


6 - 


- 11 




907 


12 - 


- 14 




514 


15 - 


- 18 




739 


19 - 


- 25 


1. 


, 055 


26 - 


- 35 


1 


, H5 



36 - 


45 


2, 


.037 


46 - 


55 


2, 


358 


56 - 


65 


1, 


955 


66 - 


■ 75 


1, 


029 


76 - 


■ 100 


1, 


068 



84 



Total number of households - 5,559 

Comparative Vital Statistics Recorded 
2004 2005 2006 

101 116 

107 106 

72 52 

Shellfish Licenses and Permits 



Births 


116 


Deaths 


108 


Marriages 


74 



2004 



2005 



93 


76 


144 


120 


70 


91 





15 


31 


24 


97 


85 


11 


10 


9 


3 



2006 



Resident Yearly- 
Resident Family- 
Resident Commercial 
Over 70 Commercial 
Over 60 Recreational 
Non-Resident Yearly 
Non-Resident Daily 
Eagle Hill Stickers 



Revenue from 2006 Shellfish licenses - $ 68,630.00 

Dog Licenses 

During 2006 the Town Clerk's Office registered 1,911 dogs 



84 


128 


116 


17 


22 


138 


12 


5 



Revenue Report 

Antiques & Old Metals 

Auction Permits 

Automatic Amusement Licenses 

Beer and Wine Licenses 

Books-Street Lists, By-Laws & Maps 

Class I, Class II & Class III Licenses 

Common Victuallers Licenses 

Dog Licenses 

Flammables Licenses 

Liquor Licenses (All Alcoholic) 

Marriage Licenses 

Miscellaneous Fees 

One-Day All Alcoholic Licenses 



210.00 

500.00 
1,600.00 
9, 050.00 
2, 565.00 
1, 600.00 
4, 550.00 
19, 663.00 

625. 00 

39,400.00 

1,575.00 

699.00 
1, 090.00 



85 



One-Day Beer & Wine Licenses 2,060.00 

Raffle Permits 95.00 

Recording Fees 2,867.00 

Seasonal All Alcoholic Licenses 6,700.00 

Shellfish Permits 61,185.00 

Sporting Licenses 56.00 

Sunday Entertainment Licenses 2,800.00 

Weekday Entertainment Licenses 1,400.00 

Total $160,290.00 

Massachusetts Department of Fisheries and Wildlife 

Licenses Sold - 157 
Stamps Sold - 8 5 

Sales remitted to State :$ 3,769.75 

******** 

ELECTIONS AND REGISTRATIONS 

I. The Board of Registrars 

The Board of Registrars is comprised of the following 
members : 

Philip F. Grenier, Chairman 

Robert M. Stone 

Elizabeth McCarthy 

Pamela Z. Carakatsane, CMC 

II. Town Meetings: 

April 3, 2006 - The Annual Town Meeting covered 27 
Articles. There were 531 registered voters who 
attended. 

October 16, 2006 - The Special Town Meeting covered 20 
Articles. There were 235 registered voters who 
attended. 

III. Elections: 

April 11, 2006 - Annual Town Election 

Votes Cast: 278 

Number of Registered Voters: 9,120 
Turnout: 3% 

September 19, 2006 - State Primary Election 



86 



Votes Cast: 1,964 

Number of Registered Voters: 9,300 

Turnout: 21% 

November 7, 2006 - State Election 

Votes Cast: 6,282 

Number of Registered Voters: 9,582 

Turnout: 66% 

Registered Voters By Precinct as of December 31, 2006 

Precinct Democrat Republican Unenrolled 



1 


498 


365 


1,305 


2 


617 


364 


1, 586 


3 


392 


471 


1,613 


4 


502 


366 


1, 523 



Also, Precinct 1 had one Libertarian registered, Precinct 2 
had one Green-Rainbow registered, Precinct 3 had one 
Libertarian registered and Precinct 4 had one Green Party 
USA registered as of December 31, 2006. 

Thank you to the Board of Registrars; the Constables, 
Wardens, Clerks, Checkers, Provisional Ballot and Tally 
persons; James Graff urn and his staff; Rick Dorr and John 
Leonard; the Ipswich Police Department; the YMCA staff; and 
the staff at the High School/Middle School who help set up 
for Town Meeting. Also, to volunteers Andrew Agapow, 
Ronald Graves, Robert Stone and my family members who spend 
many hours setting up the night before each election. They 
all have helped to make each Election and Town Meeting a 
success . 

******** 

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

Greg Parachojuk, MIS Director 

The MIS department is charged with the ongoing mission to 
develop, enhance and support the Town's computing and 
telecommunications infrastructure, and to provide the 
system and services necessary for the Town's departments 
and users to fulfill their stated goals and objectives. 



87 



As a committee member of the Cable Commission, my charter 
is to provide valuable input as to the needs of our 
community, educational and government sectors in 
conjunction with cable broadcasting. 

The Munis financial system was updated to version 2005. 
This was a major update that integrated the graphical user 
interface more closely with Windows. Some problems in the 
Utilities modules were encountered. 

Several PC's were updated between the Fire Department, 
Library, and Town Hall. A new more robust firewall was 
installed along with a higher bandwidth Internet 
connection. The Fire Department was upgraded to their own 
Internet connection due to I-Net reliability issues. 

The Town's website evolved with the addition of the News 
Blog. This extension of our website delivers emergency and 
other important town information to the general public in 
industry standard RSS newsfeed format. Newer browsers such 
as IE7 have RSS capabilities built in to make it easy to 
manage information. Please visit our website at 
http : / /www . town . ipswich . ma . us to access assessment data, 
tax maps, online payments, forms and other useful 
information. 

******** 

PURCHASING/BUDGET/RISK MANAGEMENT 

Jane H. Spellman 
Assistant Purchasing Agent 
Risk Management Coordinator 
Safety Coordinator 

The Purchasing Office employee oversees and monitors all 
department procurements with the exception of the day to 
day expenditures of the Electric Department and School 
Department; puts out to bid expenditures in excess of 
$25,000 for goods and services for all departments except 
the School Department; and bids construction contracts for 
all departments except the School Department, all in 
accordance with Massachusetts General Laws. 

In addition to present contract renewals, the following 
were advertised, put out to bid, bids received with 
contracts awarded: Maintenance & Repair Services for HVAC, 
Forest Fire Truck for Fire Department, Paint and Painting 



Streetlines, Resurfacing Various Roads, Telecommunications 
Consulting Discover Phase, Comcast/MECnet Agreement of 
Agent for Workplace Service, Plantings at Ipswich River 
Walk, Ambulance Service Renewal, Installation of HVAC at 
Utilities Garage and Office Area, Vehicle Maintenance, 
Employee Classification Study, Guard Rails, Legal Services 
Relating to Cable TV License, Audit Services for Electric 
Department, 8 0kW Micro Turbine System at the Town Wharf, 
WTP Water Sludge Handling Study, Sand, Engineering Services 
to Planning Board, Snow Plowing Contracts, Public Library 
Parking Lot Construction, Bituminous Highway Materials, 
Salt Cooperative Contract, Electric Department Flame 
Resistant Uniforms Program, Six-Wheel Dump Truck Cab & 
Chassis for the Highway Department. 

The Purchasing Office oversaw all Workers Compensation 
long-term cases and reported all Town and School employee 
injuries. All property and casualty insurance claims 
received were reported to the Town's insurance carrier. 
Insurance renewals were processed, policies received, and 
vehicle, equipment and computer inventories maintained. 

The Purchasing Office was also responsible for collecting, 
editing, copying, collating and distributing 25 budget 
copies while meeting the set deadline. Budget details with 
adopted figures for FY08 Budget are inputted and 
distributed to Departments by this office after the Annual 
Town Meeting. 

Safety Concern and Suggestion Forms are made available and 
are still occasionally used by employees and citizens. 
Each concern is addressed and responded to. Safety 
training sessions for employees were held in October which 
was deemed Safety Month. 

The Purchasing Office is also responsible for the 
compiling, editing, printing and distribution of this 
Annual Town Report . 



89 



******** 



IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Victor Dyer, Director 

Collections : New books added: 4,058 (Adult & Young Adult) 
1,875 (Children). New media added: 483 (Adult & Young 
Adult) 268 (Children) . Library users now have access to 
downloadable audio books through Overdrive. 

Technology : 16,600+ patrons signed up to use the Internet 
PCs while 16,800+ hits were recorded on the library's web 
site in 2006. We replaced 2 PCs and added 2 laptops & a 
laser printer for public use. Our Newsletter & the 
Children's Calendar are now in PDF format. We have 2 new 
databases: P4a Antiques Reference & Heritage Quest. 

Staff : Joining the staff was Kathryn Morris as Page & 
Michelle Guvendiren as Temporary Summer Assistant in the 
Children' s Room, Emily Goodhue as Sunday Reference 
Librarian, Mary Lou Murphy as Sunday Desk Assistant and 
Paul Wegzyn as Custodian. Several staff members were able 
to attend the Public Library Association Conference in 
Boston in April. The Library Director was invited to speak 
on a panel at PLA on outcome-based evaluations of the 
'Ipswich Reads... One Book' Program. 

Volunteers : This year Volunteers donated over 1,267 hours 
of service. The library enjoys the services of a senior 
volunteer through R.S.V.P. of Gloucester. The Town and 
Country Garden Club helped maintain the library grounds. 
The Ipswich Garden Club decorated the library for the 
holidays, both inside and outside. Dorcas Rice decorated 
the mantel in the Rogers Room for the holidays. 

Board of Trustees : The Board approved use of $35,000 of 
LIG/MEG funds for construction of the staff parking lot. 
The Board offered to pay $4000 for the first year of Sunday 
afternoon library hours. The Selectmen accepted this offer 
and arranged for additional funds to be added to the 
library budget to begin these new service hours. The Board 
approved a modified Library Internet Use Policy and a 
revised Materials Selection Policy. The Board also funded 
membership in an online book club (Dear Reader) which is 
available to patrons. 



90 



Plan of Service : Some of the activities accomplished in 
2006 included: weeding collections in computer science, 
philosophy, psychology, religion and history; training 
volunteers for Archives; expanded hours on Sundays. 

Public Relations : The library produced two issues of its 
Newsletter in 2006. The Ipswich Reads... One Book! Program 
continued into a second year with Bill Bryson's A Walk in 
the Woods. The library began to run an occasional column in 
the Ipswich Chronicle titled 'Library Life' written by 
staff member Betsy Johnson. 

Building : Compromised roof supports were replaced over the 
Rogers Room. An RFP went out for the repair of the slate 
roof. The staff parking lost was substantially completed in 
the fall. The Town & Country Garden Club added three 
decorative boulders to the library's landscaping. This 
donation marks the end of the Garden Club's association 
with the library after many years of much appreciated 
volunteer effort. 

Friends : The Friends supported the library with funds for 
new materials, children's programs & supplies while 
presenting a series of enlightening evening programs. 
Friends' funds paid to have ultraviolet filtering film 
installed on several windows. 

Bequests & Gifts : Donations were received in memory of Jane 
Rieman, George Roadman, Ray Broekel & Myron Taylor. A $50 
donation was received from Heritage Wholesalers, Inc., and 
a $220 donation from the Ipswich Chronicle . The Trustees 
also accepted a $1,500 anonymous donation. An oil painting 
by Miranda Updike was also donated to the library. 

Programs : The Children's Department offered 170 programs 
with 3,736 children participating. There were 14 Adult/YA 
programs with 157 participants. The ESL program continued 
to match students with tutors. The Children's Room began 
sponsoring a Chess Club. 

Circulation : Total circulation in 2006 was 129,114 items. 
The library borrowed 11,368 items through interlibrary 
loan. 

Grants : The library received a $2,000 grant from the 
Coburn Charitable Society for the purchase of large print 
and audiovisual materials. 



91 



Awards : The library received a 'Milestone in Historic 
Records' Award from the Essex National Heritage Commission 
and a 'Library Customer Success Award' from EBSCO 
Publishing. Our 'One Book' project for 2005 was designated 
an 'exemplary' project by the Massachusetts Board of 
Library Commissioners in its report to the Institute of 
Museum and Library Services. 

Archives : Over 3 00 researchers signed up to use the 
Archives in 2006. 

******** 
SCHOOL DEPARTMENT - Richard L. Korb, Superintendent 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Jeffrey Loeb, Chair 

The year 2006 was an exciting year for the Ipswich Schools. 
The year began with exciting tournament runs by the Boys 
and Girls Basketball teams with the Boys ending up at the 
Garden and the Girls losing on a half court shot at the 
buzzer. The year ended with the Football team winning the 
State Championship. During the year we celebrated the 
various accomplishments of our students. For example, in 
the spring, a walk by the High School Guidance Department 
displayed Tiger Paws bearing the names of the colleges that 
the products of our school system gained acceptance into. 

In every area our students excelled. While the awards may 
have been earned by high school students, the skills that 
they displayed were the results of everything that they had 
been taught throughout their years in the Ipswich Schools. 
So we looked at these accomplishments of the District as a 
whole and not just an individual or a team. Whether it was 
athletics or academics or the arts, our students benefited 
from the teaching that they received from the moment that 
they entered our school system and therefore by extension 
from the support that the schools have received from the 
Town. 

Our schools continue to be seen as one of the shining 
lights on the North Shore. Even though we now have over 
150 choice- in students, we have considerably more students 
applying to join our schools than we have room. Over the 
last ten years we have gone from having a balance in the 



92 



numbers of choice-in and choice-out we now have about 10 
choice-out students. 

Even as the reputation of our schools continues to grow, 
there are still obstacles that we must overcome. About a 
year ago we celebrated being named a Blue Ribbon School by 
the federal government . Now the same set of laws that said 
that we were an example for the rest of the country says 
that we are in danger of failing. Notwithstanding the fact 
that our MCAS scores are among the highest in the state and 
none of our students have been denied a diploma for failing 
the MCAS test, under No Child Left Behind our scores must 
continue to improve or we will be deemed to be failing as a 
school system. Even though there are no funds to meet this 
federal mandate our teachers and administrators are working 
to come up with ways to achieve the requirements that have 
been imposed on us . 

The School Committee appreciates the support that the 
Schools receive from this town. It is, however, our job to 
advocate for more. Do not take our advocacy as a sign that 
we do not appreciate what we have received. As with 
anything there is never enough money to accomplish 
everything that we want to. We will continue to advocate 
for the children of Ipswich, and let everyone know that we 
are blessed with outstanding teachers and support personnel 
who have figured out how to make do with less for the 
benefit of our children. 

******** 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Richard L. Korb 

The FY07 school year was once again filled with numerous 
challenges and rewards. We continue to face mounting 
fiscal problems impacting the school district's ability to 
deliver the educational services this community has come to 
expect and deserve. Programs have been reduced and staff 
cut in order to balance the budget . 

In spite of these financial challenges, our dedicated and 
talented staff continues to adopt the philosophy that we 
must always move forward as we look for ways to continue to 
improve . 



93 



Our Birth to Three Program is flourishing, now serving over 
700 families in the community. This Program is funded by a 
grant from the state. 

Our MCAS scores place us far above the State average in 
over 90% of the categories. However, even with that 
success, we continue to strive to improve our scores and 
get better. Each year teams of teachers spend hours 
analyzing our test results and make the necessary 
adjustments in our curriculum to ensure that we are aligned 
with the State Frameworks . 

This past year, the administration and the School Committee 
worked collaboratively on a number of subcommittees in the 
areas of budget development, policy development, 
technology, Feoffees, and athletics. We also initiated a 
series of Study Committees to review different aspects of 
our programs and explore how we might improve them. Those 
Study Committee initiatives were the Secondary Curriculum 
Study Committee and the Middle School Trips Study 
Committee. This year we also implemented the Demographic 
Study Committee, which will review the use and capacity of 
our elementary buildings, conduct a comprehensive analysis 
of the population growth in our schools and community, and 
evaluate our existing grade level alignment. 

The FY07 school year also saw the continuation of the 
Elementary Capital Improvements Projects addressing Phase 
II of the Doyon Window Project, Phase II of the Winthrop 
Roof Project, and Phase I of the Doyon Roof Replacement 
Project. All of these capital improvement initiatives have 
been aimed at improving the infrastructure of the 
elementary buildings, as well as reducing our energy costs. 

We also received a grant from the Department of Energy 
Resources that allowed us to upgrade the lighting in both 
of our elementary schools as well as the Payne School. 

The liquidated damages suit related to the delays in the 
completion of the new Middle/High School was finally 
settled, and we were awarded over $400,000 in damages, 
which would be used to not only cover legal fees, but also 
for energy saving initiatives at the Middle/High School. 
We have insulated areas of the building were under- 
insulated during construction, as well as beginning the 
installation of an energy management system. We will be 
replacing gymnasium lights with a more efficient model, and 



94 



installing a water treatment system that will reduce the 
wear and tear on building equipment due to mineral deposit 
buildups . 

The Ipswich Public Schools continues to be recognized 
across the Commonwealth as a leader in the area of 
integration of technology into our curriculum. Ipswich 
Middle School this past year was selected by the Intel 
Technology Corporation to "pilot" a new product called the 
"Ultra Mobile PC." With this rich technology enhanced 
learning system, the Grade 7 Middle School classes 
conducted ocean cluster science studies, which placed them 
on the cutting edge of this new integrated technology. The 
ultimate goal of this kind of educational culture is to 
have students become self -directed learners who strive 
toward continuous improvement through reflection and self- 
assessment . 

In conclusion, I want to express my sincere appreciation to 
the citizens of Ipswich who have given so generously to 
support quality education for all of our children. I urge 
every citizen to join school officials in our continuing 
effort to lobby for increased State funding for education, 
and to develop a Chapter 70 formula which will ensure, once 
and for all, an equitable and balanced distribution of 
funds for all schools in the Commonwealth. 

Finally, I want to express my sincere appreciation to the 
staff of the Ipswich Public Schools, whose dedication and 
commitment to excellence is second to none. 



******** 



IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL 

Barry Cahill, Principal 

The Calendar year 2006 brought continued success and 
acclaim to Ipswich High School . The year opened with our 
recognition assembly recognizing the NCLB Blue Ribbon Award 
from the United States Department of Education. The year 
ended with a victory over Cape Cod Tech in the Division 3A 
Super Bowl. The Super Bowl win under Coach Ted Flaherty was 
the first since a 1992 victory under Coach Jack Welch. 



95 




Again on the athletic front, the entire athletic department 
was recognized when the Hyland Trophy was awarded to 
Ipswich High School as the top overall athletic program in 
the Cape Ann League Small Schools category. 

The music program focused fall fundraising efforts 
preparing for a trip to England upcoming in April. The 
drama program "The Company" received an invitation to the 
American High School Theatre Festival in Scotland for next 
August . 

Academic excellence continued in 2006. Eighty-eight percent 
of our graduates from the class of 2006 went on to a two or 
four year college. We had a National Merit Finalist and 
several Merit Commendation winners. In the MCAS , 87% of our 
sophomores scored Advanced or Proficient in English with 
81% in these categories in Mathematics. Our graduates were 
accepted at a number of prestigious colleges including: 
Boston College, M.I.T., Wellesley, Carnegie Mellon and Holy 
Cross. Students were accepted at more than 164 colleges and 
universities . 

We are again thankful for the generosity of our students, 
parents and members of the community. We received a 
substantial donation from one family bringing their total 
contribution to over $100,000 over the last three years. 
Donations from other parents, I.C.E. (Ipswich Citizens for 
Education) and the Friends of Athletics have allowed us to 
prosper during relatively lean budget times. 



96 



Ipswich High School is well recognized at the state level 
for its excellence and high standards. Excellence in 
academics, the arts, and athletics combine with community- 
service to rank IHS as one of the top high schools in 
Massachusetts and the country as a whole. Community members 
can and should be proud of the character and culture of our 
faculty and students as well as demonstrated success in 
many areas. IHS is a school of very proud tigers! 



******** 



IPSWICH MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Cheryl Forster, Principal 

I am pleased to be reporting to the citizens of Ipswich in 
my twelfth year as principal of this dynamic and exciting 
school. We are now in the seventh year in this building, 
enjoying the warm learning environment we have created here 
together. The school design has allowed us to get to know 
our students very quickly, and each grade has developed its 
own culture creating three distinct neighborhoods. The 
facility has allowed students and teachers to access state 
of the art technology as well as world-class art, music, 
and drama programs. Our students continue to learn "new 
basics" along with the old ones, as we find that both are 
truly important in today's world of work. 

Educating students has never been more challenging with the 
added mandated testing we now administer in all grades. 
Test results we received validated the good work being done 
in our classrooms by our teachers. MCAS testing is 
completed every spring, and Ipswich continues to do well. 
This year the Intel Corporation selected the Middle School 
as a learning laboratory for new technology which they were 
beta testing. We were the only school in the country to 
work with them. Students in Grade 7 were assigned a unit 
to use in school for science exploration and inquiry. They 
were allowed to bring them home as well. Intel was very 
impressed with the professionalism of our teachers and the 
attitude and skills of our students. 



97 




Ipswich Middle School also had a visitor from China. Mr. 
Ren is the principal of the Tianjin Middle School and is my 
counterpart in a Principal Shadowing Project funded by the 
Freeman Foundation and the Chinese Exchange Initiative. He 
was very impressed with the relationships we form with our 
students and the personal interest we take in their 
success. It will be interesting to report what I find on 
my trip to China this spring as I explore and learn from 
educators half way around the world. 

Excellent middle schools strive to reach the all -important 
whole child. Each grade level specializes in exploratory 
and child centered topics that offer a variety of learning 
experiences and opportunities. At the Ipswich Middle 
School, we work in a "team" approach. Teaching blocks are 
longer for in-depth learning, technology is readily 
available, and class size is limited for maximum skill 
building. It is a cooperative venture. 

Middle School is a time of choices and contrasts. Whether 
it is the quiet solitude of our peaceful courtyard complete 
with koi fish or the pandemonium in the gym created by our 
tiger mascot, there is something for everyone here at IMS. 

Students in Grade 6 spend an intensive and focused week in 
the spring at an environmental camp, Ferry Beach in Saco, 
Maine. All of our sixth grade staff attends to form close 
bonds with the students. The outdoor marine curriculum is 



98 



high interest, and many new friends and relationships are 
forged. 

Grade 7 students learn first hand about the local ecology 
with a series of eight separate days in the woods, marshes 
and in canoes on the Ipswich River, seeing first hand where 
their river begins and ends. They canoe through miles of 
forest, wetlands and marsh, collecting data all the way and 
brainstorm ways to protect our precious environment and 
natural resources. 

Grade 8 students spend four days in early June in the 
Adirondacks in upper state New York. A geology focus helps 
prepare them for visits to chasms and caves and learn the 
difference first hand between stalactites and stalagmites 
in Howe Caverns. They cruise the glacial lakes and rivers 
and come to appreciate the power of erosion and glacial 
landforms. It is a wonderful culminating experience for 
them as they leave Middle School . 

We continue to provide an after school homework program for 
all interested students and their families; and we 
understand the need for students to be busy and supervised 
after the last school bell rings. We offer many enriching 
programs to meet the interests of all types of children. 
Our drama, dance and music departments involve more than 
half of our student population. Student athletes 
participate in sports programs that teach skills, 
sportsmanship and wellness. At the peak of intramural 
basketball season, more than 250 students are involved. We 
offer golf, tennis, soccer, ice hockey, softball, 
volleyball, field hockey, basketball, art club, music 
programs, drama and monthly dances. We teach a course 
called "People Smarts" which focuses on interpersonal 
skills and multiple intelligences. A monthly "service" 
component has taken the form of food pantry, shoe and coat 
drives. We also participate in the annual "Walk for 
Hunger" where together we walk a 10 -mile circuit around 
Great Neck and back to raise funds for the Ipswich Food 
Pantry. 

We are proud to be part of such an innovative and exciting 
learning environment. Our outstanding professional faculty 
works diligently to clarify our vision for education - that 
every child can learn. We are constantly finding new ways 
to reach and teach all children who come to our school. 
They are, after all, the future of Ipswich. It is an 



99 



exciting time to be working with young people. Our slogan 
is "Making a difference starts here." We believe that, we 
love our work, and we invite you to join us. 



******** 



PAUL F. DOYON MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

Kenneth B. Cooper, Ph.D. Principal 

This past year certainly presented its challenges, both 
fiscally and educationally; but the Doyon 
School Learning Community again rose to the 
challenges. Looking back, and notwithstanding 
very tight budgetary constraints, the year was 
one of progress and accomplishments. 

Our primary academic goal was to continue to strengthen our 
balanced literacy program. We again partnered with the 
Center for Applied Child Development at Tufts University 
and provided teachers with personalized coaching in 
teaching reading comprehension strategies. Each team of 
teachers was able to meet to develop units and plan 
implementation approaches on multiple occasions and for 
extended periods of time throughout the year. Most grades 
also met for several days over the summer to draft "year 
long literacy maps," and to identify mentor texts to be 
used in teaching each comprehension concept. We were also 
able to provide sixteen faculty members with a series of 
math workshops taught by Kit Norris, former Math Department 
Chairperson at Simmons College; a workshop for teachers of 
reading on "Fluency, " taught by Amy Smith, Reading Teacher 
at the Ipswich Middle School; and thirty Doyon staff 
members attended a refresher course on our grammar and 
writing program Framing Your Thoughts taught by Nancy 
Raskins of the Language Circle. All of these workshops and 
trainings were done "in house" - i.e., they were held in 
Ipswich as opposed to going out to workshops. It is 
important to note that only minimal funding for 
professional development and professional development 
substitutes was provided last year in our budget. The above 
professional development activities were for the most part 
made possible by non-budgetary funds, including the support 
of the Elementary School Golf Tournament. 

We continue to receive outstanding support from the Friends 
of Ipswich Elementary School (FRIES) . They provided us 
this year with the resources to acquire a fantastic lateral 



100 



climbing wall that is being utilized in physical education 
classes at all grade levels. The FRIES also sponsored 
numerous classroom and school -wide enrichment programs, 
volunteered in support of numerous programs and activities, 
provided funding for our Student Leadership and Early Act 
Teams, and helped us to acquire extensive new text 
materials for our media center. The Ipswich Citizens for 
Education helped us to acquire a computer projector and 
mobile cart for each grade level. We again benefited this 
year from funds raised in the Elementary School Golf 
Tournament and from several independent donations and 
gifts. To all of these groups, and to all of the folks who 
contributed in any way, we extend our deepest appreciation 
and gratitude. 

We were generally pleased with our recent MCAS testing 
results which exceeded state averages in every subject and 
grade level. Our 2006 "graduating" grade five class (who 
are now grade six students in the IMS) scored at the 
highest levels we have ever seen in both language arts and 
mathematics with very impressive numbers of students 
scoring at "advanced" and "proficient" levels. This past 
year we began regular use at all grade levels of a reading 
assessment called "GRADE" which will be administered in the 
fall and spring. This is an excellent longitudinal 
assessment that provides valuable information for faculty, 
and the results are shared with parents. 

We continue to focus time, energy and resources to support 
positive character traits in our children. Our SIT (Student 
Leadership Team) is stronger than ever, with 75% of grade 
four and five students participating. One SLT group has 
partnered with our local Rotary Club in a program called 
"Early Act." This past year also saw ongoing support for 
our Responsive Classroom approach; and once again, all new 
classroom teachers were trained in this method which helps 
to build a sense of community in the classroom. 

This was a year of ambitious renovations to our venerable 
Doyon building which is now 42 years young. We were able 
to replace all the lighting throughout the school with 
energy-efficient ballasts; we completed the replacement of 
all of the original windows (and we now have screens!) ; in 
the 3 00 wing, we put down new carpet and added a hallway 
sink and bubbler; and we replaced most of the roof and all 
of the edge flashing. 



101 



On this the occasion of my twentieth annual report, I would 
like to extend a special thanks to the incredibly dedicated 
and talented faculty and staff of the Doyon School with 
whom it is a pleasure to work, and to the students of the 
Doyon School who invariably greet each day with a "Good 
Morning, " and a smile - they help to keep the rest of us 
young-at -heart . As I tell the children each Monday - We are 
all in this together . 




******** 



WINTHROP ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Carolyn Davis, Principal 

The staff at the Winthrop School continues to energize our 
students in their learning through active, meaningful and 
thoughtful experiences. Their dedication to our dynamic 
learning community and their commitment to high quality 
instructional models particularly in light of the last five 
years of budget reductions are commendable. 

ACTION has been our annual school -wide theme unifying the 
school with several challenges. Students and teachers 
developed action plans to reach their goals, documented 



102 



examples of learning in action by creating a movie that was 
shown to the entire student body, showcased active ballroom 
dancing, and found many ways to take action to help others. 

For the third year, The Doyon and Winthrop Schools were 
able to work with Tufts University through outside funding 
sources such as the annual elementary school golf 
tournament and grants. This has continued to assist us in 
meeting the reading comprehension needs of our students, 
strengthen our reading program, and customize professional 
development opportunities for teachers with a concentration 
on effective reading comprehension strategies . 

The past five years of financial constraints have continued 
to erode our budget to such an extent that there has been a 
significant negative impact on the educational 
opportunities available for our students. We have lost 
staff members, programs, equipment, technology, 
professional development, library and classroom books, 
summer programs, and building improvement projects. 

Again this year, contributions from the following groups 
have made a significant difference to the Winthrop 
community, and we are grateful: 

• The Friends of Ipswich Elementary Schools 

(FRIES) funded special assemblies with 
outstanding cultural and educational programs as 
well as playground projects, professional 
development, library books, materials for the 
music and physical education programs, and 
teacher requests . 

• The Volunteers In School (VIS) program provided 
many volunteers to our school. Senior citizens, 
high school students, and parents assisted 
students by generously dedicating their time and 
energy. 

• The elementary golf tournament funded 
professional development, science materials and 
math workshops . 

• Ipswich Citizens for Education (ICE) funded 
after school programs, such as Homework Club and 
Student Leadership Council. 

• Donations from parents have funded field trips, 
books, a climbing wall, and many of our basic 
school supplies. 



103 



• Other funding sources came from Biolabs, the 
Extended Day Program, the First National Bank of 
Ipswich, Rotary, and the Run for Pies 
Thanksgiving Race . 

• Teachers spend money from their own pockets on 
school supplies, books, equipment and software. 

Winthrop educated 465 students in a 50 year old building 
from preschool to Grade 5 with approximately 80 staff 
members and 100 volunteers. The Fire and Police 
Departments, and the D.P.W. continued to assist and support 
us at a moment's notice. Once again, we wish to thank them 
for working so closely with us and ensuring the safety of 
Winthrop students, their families, and the faculty. 

We encourage the citizens of Ipswich to visit our school 
and witness firsthand the enthusiasm for learning generated 
by our students. One of our hallmarks is the respect and 
responsibility skills instilled in our students as well 
remarkable leadership skills. Our students enjoy showcasing 
their school with pride and enthusiasm. Come join them for 
a grand tour! 




******** 



DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL SERVICES 

Diana W. Minton, Director 

The Ipswich Public Schools' Department of Special Services 
has continued to provide services to our students with 



104 



disabilities. We have continued to work on aspects of our 
programming which were identified when the Massachusetts 
Department of Education did their Coordinated Program 
Review . 

Staff training has continued at a very reduced level due to 
loss of funds; however, grant funding has assisted in 
spanning the gap created by minimal local funds . 

The passage of the newest federal law (IDEA 2004) has 
established some targets for the coming years which will 
need to be incorporated into our practices here in Ipswich. 

I want to express my appreciation to all the unique and 
dedicated educators and citizens here in Ipswich. All 
education in Ipswich is special. 

******** 

HALL HASKELL HOUSE STANDING COMMITTEE 

Terri Stephens 
Stephanie Gaskins 
Co-chairs 

Mother Nature played havoc with the town by sending us 
torrential rain and lots of flooding. The water in the 
basement of the Hall-Haskell House rose to meet the first 
floor floorboards knocking out both power and destroying 
the furnace . 

Despite spring time flooding and a later opening date, the 
Visitor Center never lagged for visitors. Approx. 4800 
tourists stopped in to ask directions, do the walking tour, 
shop, eat and explore. The art gallery also benefited from 
all the foot traffic. 

Bill Nelson, Manager and Louise Ciolek, Volunteer 
Coordinator do a remarkable job in making the center run in 
an efficient and friendly atmosphere. The 45 volunteers 
who give their time are all remarkable and dedicated people 
who are knowledgeable and love their community. The 
visitor center received a grant to fund an audio-visual 
walk of Ipswich. 

The flooding also caused some cancellations of artist 
reservations for the season. Proceeds from sales in 2006 
were lagging behind prior years. When artist realized that 



105 



the center was once again open, calls for reservations 
became brisk. 

The Visitor Center is open from May 1 st to October 31 st and 
both the gallery, and visitor center function as a great 
asset to the community. Thanks for another great year. 




The Hall-Haskell Visitors' Center 
after the May flood. The cellar was flooded and the furnace destroyed 

in the flood. 



******** 



IPSWICH CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Dorothy Laurence, Chair 
Terri Unger, Co-Chair 

The Massachusetts Cultural Council allocated to the Ipswich 
Cultural Council the sum of $4,000 for grants to be awarded 
to organizations and individual artists supporting cultural 
activities that benefit our town. An additional $500 from 
the sale of art work at the Ipswich Art Show made a total 
of $4,500 granted to ten successful applicants from a pool 
of fifteen. Applicants who were awarded grants represent a 
variety of fields including visual arts, music, literature 
and dance. Both Winthrop and Doyon Schools were among the 
recipients. Additional grant information is available at 
www. mass -culture . org/lccpublic . asp . 



106 



The Twentieth Annual Art Show, held at the First Church in 
Ipswich and chaired by Kathleen O'Reilly and Sr. Pat 
Rolinger, presented a wide variety of visual art forms, 
poetry reading and dance performance. 

ICC meetings at Town Hall are open to the public. New 
members are welcome. 



-k~k-k~k-k'k-k , k 



OPEN SPACE COMMITTEE 

Glenn Hazelton and Carolyn Britt, Co-Chairs 

During 2006, the Open Space Committee continued to work 
with the Planning Board to review new subdivision plans. 
We have also been working with the Conservation Steward, 
who works part time in the Planning Department, in laying 
the groundwork to establish management plans for town- owned 
open space and conservation restrictions. The focus of 
this effort has been on the parcels newly acquired or 
otherwise protected under the Open Space Bond. 

Although not a formal member of the committee, the Bond 
administrator attends all of our monthly meetings. He 
spends a considerable portion of his time researching 
grants and exploring cooperative arrangements that would 
facilitate the protection of priority open space parcels. 
This past year he focused on a group of parcels on Great 
Neck. 

As always, we welcome participation in the committee and 
welcome you to our meetings. 

IPSWICH BAY CIRCUIT TRAIL COMMITTEE 

Lawrence Eliot, Chair 

Last year the Committee continued to work on the portion of 
the Bay Circuit Trail that goes along the southern edge of 
the Country Club through Conservation land and Marini ' s 
farm to Willowdale State Forest. This year, with the trail 
clearly marked by the Boy Scouts, all necessary approvals 



107 



and a contractor, we plan for work to begin this summer. 
We have the funds for the materials and are looking for 
volunteers to construct the three bridges. 

The Bay Circuit Guide to Walks in and Around Ipswich 
continues to sell well and can be purchased at local stores 
and the Town Hall. The new Guide includes: digital maps, 
new sketches of the flora through a grant from the Ipswich 
Arts Council and text revisions as needed. 

The Committee continues to consult with Turner Hill to 
insure that trails are open and are well marked. As land 
is developed, the committee continues to work with the Open 
Space Committee, Planning Board and Conservation Commission 
to see that trails are preserved and kept open for the 
enjoyment of residents. 

Guided trail hikes have continued to be organized, 
advertised in the Chronicle, and led by members of the 
Committee. This informal walking/hiking group continues to 
meet at Town Wharf parking lot on Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m. 
to explore local trails. 



******** 



GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 

Gerry Brown, Chair 

The Government Study Committee is an advisory committee that 
makes recommendations to the Board of Selectmen (BOS) . We 
look to the BOS for direction to determine the agenda that 
the committee works on. We have a broad mission that 
includes making a more efficient, effective local government 
to benefit the citizens of Ipswich, 

The Committee meets monthly. Throughout 2006 our main focus 
was on the budget process and to determine if it would be more 
beneficial to move Spring Town Meeting to a later date. An 
in-depth survey was created regarding the current budget 
process. It was distributed to the Town Manager, BOS, Finance 
Committee, School Committee Members, all Department Heads, and 
appropriate school administrators. Based on the data and 
feedback collected, the committee made the recommendation to 
the BOS in January of 2007 to move Town Meeting to the second 
Tuesday in May. 

The Government Study Committee is looking for additional 
members. If you are interested, please contact the Town 
Manager for more information. Help make a difference in 
Ipswich. 



108 



******** 



IPSWICH RECYCLING COMMITTEE 

Renato DiLorenzo 

The goal of the Ipswich Recycling Committee is to advise 
the Board of Selectmen on how to reduce the overall cost to 
the town by reducing the amount of trash that is produced 
by the residents and businesses in the town. In 2006, a 
recommendation was made to enforce the guidelines that were 
already created, which was to not allow more than four bags 
of trash per household and to enforce the mandatory 
recycling. By doing this, we have seen a sharp increase in 
the amount of materials that are diverted from the trash. 
In comparing calendar 2005 to calendar 2006, 200 tons more 
were recycled in 2006 versus 2005; and the total solid 
waste decreased by 682 tons during that time. This results 
in savings for the town of over $60,000. 

Other successes that we have had in 2006 include: 

The size of the acceptable recycling container has 

increased to 3 gallon barrels. 

Waste Management now allows us to collect all plastics 

labeled 1-7. 

Several Abitabi paper retrievers have been placed in 

town which has helped to increase paper recycling. 

As a Committee, we have tried to increase awareness in the 
town and have done so by creating the website 
www.IpswichRecycles.org; by having articles in the 
Chronicle each week; and by having more of a presence at 
public events. We will continue in 2007 to try to raise 
awareness by co- sponsoring an electronics and book 
recycling event in May. We will also try to have a presence 
at all public events. We would like to see the recycling 
rate increase to over 30% of all trash that is collected in 
2007, which is still well below the state recommended 
guidelines of 50%. Finally, we would like to develop 
attainable goals for each household to assist everyone in 
their recycling efforts. 

A thank you goes out to all citizens who have increased 
their recycling participation and efforts. Keep up the 
good work. 



109 



Increase Recycling 

In the first 3 months of the committee, 20% 
Recycling. Last Quarter, 28% 



2 Year Recycling Rate 



30% 




— Recycling Percentage — Linear (Recycling Percentage) 



Reduce Solid Waste 



In the first 3 months of the committee, average 
of 425 tons/month. Last Qtr, 360 tons/month 

2 Year Solid Waste Trend 







o J CS J <y 

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y v ^ 



J> & & $ $ ■# v o fe # & 
* J J f 4 </ 3* $ J 



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110 



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TRUST FUND COMMISSION 

Robert K. Weatherall, Chair 
Walter Pojasek, Vice Chair 
Jean Emerson 

Since the summer of 2005, the Commission has invested the 
funds in its care in a mix of stocks and bonds to protect 
the value of its funds from the ravages of inflation and if 
possible to achieve a gain in value. The mix is a 
conservative one, with just a thirty- three percent 
investment in stock mutual funds and exchange -traded 
shares. Nevertheless, the funds as a whole achieved a 7.4 8 
percent gain over the calendar year, comparing total assets 
at the end of the year with assets at the beginning (and 
counting in income spent during the year) . Inflation was 
less than half that. On the recommendation of the 
Commission's investment manager, the Trust Department at 
Cape Ann Savings Bank, the Commission voted at the end of 
the year to add two American -managed international stock 
funds to its investment portfolio to benefit from the 
growth in international asset values. 

The Commission meets each year before high school 
graduation in June to review how much accumulated income 
there is in the Town's scholarship funds so that those 
designated by the donors to choose the scholars know how 
much they can award. The Commission authorized the spending 
of $8,900, to be awarded to 10 recipients according to the 
wishes of the donors. The Commission also approved a charge 
of $3,130 against the Harold Bowen fund to pay a consultant 
for work done for the Historical Commission, making a total 
of $12,03 spent from the funds during the calendar year. 
This compares with $7,500 awarded in scholarships in 
calendar year 2005 and $2,244 spent from other funds. 

******** 

IPSWICH AGRICULTURAL COMMISSION 

Laura Russell, Chair 

The formation of the Ipswich Agricultural Commission was 
passed at Town Meeting in October of 2005. The Commission 
spent the early part of 2006 compiling topics and issues 
facing a diverse group of farmers and landowners. The 
first official order of business was to establish formal 



111 



commission and assign terms. There are now seven members 
and two alternates (with one vacant alternate position) . 

The Commission has been working on a work plan for the next 
year. Topics that have been discussed include establishing 
a solid relationship with other town boards and committees; 
increasing interest among townsfolk for all the advantages 
that Ipswich agricultural businesses bring to the 
community; and creating a "toolkit" for farmers and other 
agricultural enterprises. 




Petting the livestock at Appleton Farms 




Pumpkins and the corn maze at Marini Farms 



112 




Hayrides at Russell Orchards 



******** 



CABLE TV ADVISORY BOARD 

Robert Ryan, Chairman 

The Cable Advisory Board had a very busy year, negotiating 
with both Verizon and Comcast for licenses to provide cable 
television service to the town. Our goal was to license 
multiple providers, thereby providing residents with more 
choices and better value by encouraging competition. We are 
happy to report that negotiations with Verizon went very 
smoothly, culminating with the Town signing a 10 year 
license with them in August. The terms of the license 
provide the Town with funding to be used to sustain and 
improve local access programming (government, community and 
school meetings and events) . As of this writing, the Town 
is approximately 65% wired with their new FIOS fiber optic 
system, which is an exciting new fiber optic technology 
capable of very high speeds and bandwidth. 

Unfortunately, the negotiations with Comcast have not gone 
as well. We were not able to come to agreeable terms with 
them by the expiration of their old license in October of 
2006. Therefore, we entered a process of denial and are 
still negotiating as of this writing. However, this does 
not affect their service to the Town during this period. We 
hope to have this resolved by early 2007. 



113 



The reason that the funding from the cable providers is so 
important is that Comcast is closing their community studio 
in Newburyport which has been used by five surrounding 
towns in the past to broadcast their local programming. 
Therefore, each town must now provide their own studio 
facilities. Although this is an inconvenience right now, we 
feel that in the long term, it will result in much improved 
quality and variety of local programming. 



******** 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT OF 1990 

This notice is published pursuant to the requirements of 
the "Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990" as published 
in the Federal Register on July 26, 1991. 

The Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts, advised the public, 
employees, and job applicants that no qualified individual 
with a disability shall, by reason of such disability, be 
excluded from participation in or be denied the benefits of 
the services, programs, activities, or employment 
opportunities in the Town of Ipswich, or be subjected to 
discrimination by the Town. A "qualified individual with a 
disability" means an individual with a disability who, with 
or without reasonable modifications to rules, policies, or 
practices, the removal of architectural, communication, or 
transportation barriers, or the provision of auxiliary aids 
and services, meets the essential eligibility requirements 
for the receipt of services, the participation in programs 
or activities, and access to job opportunities in the Town. 

The Town of Ipswich has designated the following (person or 
office) as the contact to coordinate efforts to comply with 
this requirement. Inquiries should be directed to: 

Name: Colleen E. Fermon 

Office: ADA Coordinator, Health Office 

Address: Town Hall, 25 Green Street 

Ipswich, MA 01938 
Phone Number: (978)356-6605 
Hours: 8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. Mondays 

00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Tues.-Thurs. 

00 a.m. - 12:00 noon Fridays 



114 



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THE TOWN OF IPSWICH AT YOUR 
SERVICE 

A handy Check-List of Often-Used 

Town Services: 

97 8 Area Code: 

Administration 

Town Manager 356-6609 

Accounting 

Finance Director 356-6601 

Ambulance 

Business 356-9800 

Emergency 911 

Assessments 

Assessors 356-6603 

Building & Health 

Building Inspector 356-6605 

Code Enforcement 356-6605 

Gas Inspector 356-0523 

Health Agent 356-6605 

Plumbing Inspector 356-0523 

Business Association 356-9055 

Cemetery & Parks 

Office 356-6643 

Civil Defense 

Emergency Management. . .356-6645 

Council on Aging 356-6650 

Court 

Third District Court ... 462-2652 

Crane Beach 

Gate 356-4354 

Castle Hill 356-4351 

Dog Officer 

Dog Pound 356-6652 

Animal Control Of ficer . 356-4343 

Electric Department 

Office 356-6635 

Fire Department 

Business 356-4321 

Emergency 911 

Fire Prevention 356-6631 

Harbormaster 356-4343 

Historical Society 356-2811 



Housing Authority 

Office 356 

Ipswich Chronicle .. .412 

Library 356 

Mosquito Control. . . .474 

Parking Clerk 356 

Planning & Development 

Town Planner 3 56 

Planning Board. . . .3 56 

Conservation 356 

Police Department 

Business 356 

Emergency 911 

Shellfish Info. . . .356 
Public Works Department 

Office 356 

Recycling 356 

Trash Collection. . 356 
Purchasing Off ice... 356 
Recreation Department 

Office 356 

Registry of Motor. 800-8 
School Department 

Administration. . . .356 

High School 356 

Middle School 356 

Winthrop School... 356 

Doyon School 3 56 

Selectmen 

Office 356 

Town Clerk 

Office 356 

Treasurer /Col lector 

Office 356 

Veterans Services 

Veterans Agent .... 356 
Water Department 

Office 356 

Water Treatment 356 

Utilities 356 

MIS Department 356 

Visitors Center 356 



-2860 


-1805 


-6648 


-4640 


-6611 


-6607 


-6607 


-6661 



-4343 

-6671 

-6612 
-6612 
-6612 
-6608 

-6644 
58-392 

-2935 
-3137 
-3535 
-2976 
-5506 

-6604 

-6600 

-6610 

-3915 

-6637 
-6639 
-6635 
-6670 
-8540